Author - Peter Boskov

I pass time by writing and educating others about life, fun and humor. Are you having fun yet?

Entertainment

Do You Want To Start a Band?

It’s fun and it’s challenging. If you are playing an instrument, or if you’re a good singer, maybe you should start a band. In this article, I will introduce you to the “having a band world”.
Like I said, It’s fun and it’s challenging. Playing a live show is something every musician needs to experience. The feeling you get when you come to the stage, or the feeling when the audience sings with you, no money could buy that feeling. So, starting a bend is not that simple as it seems. If you want the band to sound good, you will need to practice A LOT. Band structure mainly looks like this: Drummer, Bass player, Rhythm Guitarist, Lead Guitarist and Vocal. If you see Jazz band it’s common that you see saxophone player or piano player. But if you see the metal band, I can’t guarantee you will see a saxophone player. Every music genre has its own sound image. So the first step to forming a band is choosing a music genre the band will play. Then you need to find the right people, good musicians. Pay attention, a band with a good drummer and bass player, and not so good guitarist will sound better than a band with a good guitarist, and not so good drummer and bass player. So, it’s crucial that you find a good drummer and bass player.

When the band is formed, it’s time to hit that studio to practice! You should pick a name for the band, something unique and recognizable. Promote your band! Creating the Facebook page is a good place to start. Share, share, share! Upload the band picture, info, set up the page. It could be funny, interesting, whatever. When the band is finally done with practicing and you guys have around 15-20 songs, it’s time to hit the local gig places. No one is going to contact you if no one knows about you. So, first hit the recording studio. No need to spend money for the professional recording studio, home production studios will do just fine.

Record the best song you have and promote it well! Burn some CD’s, give it to your closest friends. Spread the word. Good promotion is really helpful. Meet new people, go to the local gig. Support other bands, they are your colleagues now. Around that time, when everything is happening all at once, you are going to be invited to perform. Because you are an underdog don’t expect the big show, because you are going to be there just to warm up the crowd. This is your chance to rise! Give your best and enjoy the music. Trust me, the crowd can see if you are nervous, and that’s ok. Just remember to enjoy the music and the moment you have. When performing for the first time, the biggest problem you are going to face is over-thinking. You are going to think what you are playing, and when is that drum fill, and what people in the crowd think, and is guitarist over-thinking too… stop! No one is here to judge, and you are just wasting your time on stage doing that. It’s normal to be nervous, but it’s sad if you are stopped to do something you want by the fears you have. So, don’t be afraid, you are here for you first!
Just keep practicing new songs, keep promoting yourself, think of new ideas that will make the band unique and the most important – enjoy.

It’s fun and it’s challenging. If you are playing an instrument, or if you’re a good singer, maybe you should start a band. In this article, I will introduce you to the “having a band world”.
Like I said, It’s fun and it’s challenging. Playing a...

Entertainment Fashion

Is Fashion an Art?

Is fashion really an art? The topic everyone on the world wide web is talking about. Yes, it is! No, it isn’t?

Even in past, history has shown us that people dressed to express themselves. Everything started with ancient Egyptians. Their clothing was filled with a variation of colors, decorated with precious gems and jewels. And it was not only made for beauty, but also for comfort. Also, their clothes have been made to keep them cool while they are in the desert. Then ancient Greeks discovered some other materials and styles. Clothing in ancient Greek has been mainly made of chiton (costume), peplos (women clothes), himation (usually worn over a chiton) and chlamys (some type of short overcoat). And we are still talking about a period of time around fall of ancient Egyptian, Greek and the Roman empire. As humans evolved, and everything around them, so did fashion.

We can see in British culture from the 1830s to 1910s some really interesting changes in fashion, including changes in styles. Clothes were seen as an expression women’s place in society. Upper-class women usually tightly laced corset over a bodice or chemisette, paired with a skirt. The hat was standard formal wear for upper and middle-class men. Woman’s shoes in the early Victorian period (the 1830s) were narrow and heelless, black or white color. The heel on the shoes changed with time, like ethics and value.

Yes, we know, fashion is fashion and art is art. But we live in a modern world where everything is “growing” so fast, and we are humans and our basic need is to express ourselves. So, can fashion also be an art form? Museums are showing fashion just as much as paintings, or other art. Fashion can tell you about history, events, culture, etc. Many of the clothes seen going down the fashion runway don’t have any particular use, and many designers create impractical clothes just because they want to show their creativity, which is exactly what artist do in their craft. Designers are expressing themselves through clothes they made. I agree that there are many big brand names that make clothes that they think is going to be popular, just so they can sell and make money. But still, there are many true artists who express themselves in the way of creation. “A lot of designers collaborate with artists and incorporate features of art into their work such as Yves Saint Laurent and Piet Mondrian in 1965. Yves Saint Laurent’s dress was inspired by artist the Piet Mondrian. It was inspired by Piet Mondrian’s work which mainly consisted of thick black lines and primary colors. In this case, fashion was literally art.”

Fashion is not necessarily about labels, it’s not about brands. It’s something else that comes within the human being. What you wear is how you present yourself to the world, it’s your identity. Especially today, when human contacts are so quick, fashion is instant language. It’s a simple way of saying complicated things.

Is fashion really an art? The topic everyone on the world wide web is talking about. Yes, it is! No, it isn’t?
Even in past, history has shown us that people dressed to express themselves. Everything started with ancient Egyptians. Their clothing was filled...

Uncategorized

It is Never Too Late For a Debut in Writing

Beauty magazines are not the only ones who celebrate the youth. It is actually everywhere. Literary organizations are also trying to find and recognize the development of rising stars under 35. There are many talented young writers, but it is sometimes hard to keep them on radars of readers.

Many writers emerge and break out in their late thirties or even after. There is a significant number of reasons for this. Many people think that if you have a good idea, you can write a book. It is actually much more difficult than that. It is a time-consuming work and it needs a great deal of attention. Not everybody has that. There are some writers who first fully raised their children before committing to their craft.

Writer Kera Yonker noticed about three years ago, the trend toward lauding youthful debuts. She went through year-end book lists, and while doing that, she came across the National Book Foundation’s 5 under 35 honorees. At the time, she has been working on publishing a book, but realized that even if she manages to do that, she won’t be qualified for such an accolade. Yonker said:” If I am ever able to publish my book, I shouldn’t let the fact that I didn’t do it sooner diminish that accomplishment and I am always so encouraged when I hear of a first-time author publishing later in their life.”

Yonker decided to start to compile an annual list of honorees of her own selection. The only condition was that they published their first books when they were 35 or more years old. She said:” I spent a couple days digging around the internet to see if such a list already existed, and couldn’t find one.” Yonker started to collect her publishers and friends submissions, informally, and opened the distinction to authors who are free to nominate themselves. Fiction or not, all genres are considerable by Yonker. The most important thing for her are strong and compelling stories.

the author of Here Comes the Sun, Nicole Dennis-Benn, was honored for her debut work this year. This was a novel that got its place in the New York Times Notable Books list. There were also, Problems, a short and bold novel written by Jade Sharma and Emily Witt with her book Future Sex.

The selections are demonstrating the range of inventive and new writing, not concerning the author’s ages. And, they are intentionally broad. Yonker explained:” Books like Debbie Clarke Moderow’s Fast Into the Night, about her experience as a musher on the Iditarod, and Nick Lovegrove’s The Mosaic Principle, about the benefits of building a broad career, are great examples of what we’re celebrating with the list. None of these books could have been written by the authors at 25 ― the writing is informed by their experience. As readers, we’re lucky these authors persevered in telling their stories.”

The older you are the more life experience you have. So, why should we celebrate writers who are young when debuting as an older writer, 35 years old or more, brings much more benefits? There are many opinions on this subject, but Yonker said:” I think a lot of industries celebrate their wunderkinds, and publishing is no exception. A young author offers the promise of more to come. Once they’re someone to watch, there’s hopefully a built-in book-buying audience for their future titles.”

Beauty magazines are not the only ones who celebrate the youth. It is actually everywhere. Literary organizations are also trying to find and recognize the development of rising stars under 35. There are many talented young writers, but it is sometimes hard...

Entertainment Galleries

The Cast of Law and Order – Then & Now

Do you know L&O was live for 20 years?! Holding the record (along with Gunsmoke) for the longest air Drama TV show ever. The series was nominated for 202 TV awards, winning 44 of them. Very impressive. Still the show was taken off at 2010 and we just had to go and find out what are beloved cast is up to these days.

Anthony Anderson as Detective Kevin Bernard

law and order

Okay, this guy was absolutely hilarious. You’ve gotta admit it, watching him has always been a pleasure.

Do you know L&O was live for 20 years?! Holding the record (along with Gunsmoke) for the longest air Drama TV show ever. The series was nominated for 202 TV awards, winning 44 of them. Very impressive. Still the show was taken off at 2010 and we just had...

editorial

Fall exhibitons – part 2

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Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium

This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after what the artist switched to the tropicalist spirit of the 1960s, presenting wearable capes, tents full of hay and agitrprop against Brazil’s ruling junta. Many figurines in Brazilian art have denounced the ejection of Dilma Rouseff, as an opponent of the military regime, as a modern time coup.

It is on view in Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 1 October – 2 January

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Monet: The Early Years

During 1920s this painter, who became a synonym for impressionism studied his two old friends and colleagues. It was his mentor Eugene Boudin, whose amazing seascapes passed really well within the new bourgeoisie, and his good friend Edouard Manet, whose flat nudes caused a scandal at the Salon at the time. This show is dedicated to the early work of Claude Monet, including his “Luncheon on the Grass” and his still unbelievable “Magpie”

It is on view in Kimbell Museum of Art, Fort Worth, 16 October – 29 January

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Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910 – 1950

After the Mexican revolution, a new painterly vocabulary appeared, thanks to country’s artists. It was a fusion of European modernism and local folklore traditions, which later became a global phenomenon. This huge show includes paintings by Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo alongside photography, books, and graphic design. There are also some the country’s most awesome murals, created by masters such as Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. It’s the most important 20th-century Mexican art exhibition in the U.S. since the second world war.

It is on view in Philadelphia Museum of Art, 25 October – 8 January

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Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation

This a huge treasury of sculptures, textiles and gold, which travels from Germany to the U.S. for this historical exhibition, exactly 500 years after this religious reformer nailed his 95 theses to a church door in Wittenberg. Later, some iconoclastic Protestants made Luther endorsed painted images in a manner of encouraging piety, and some German painters, such as Lucas Cranach the Elder, who made magnificent narrative tableaux that jibed with Luther’s preaching. The show will also display bric-a-brac from the Luther family home, with jewelry and furniture.

It is on view in Minneapolis Institute of Art, 30 October – 15 January

Ugo Rondinone: Good Evening Beautiful Blue

This is the exhibition of Swiss master, known for glowing rainbows and stacks of fluorescent rocks in the Nevada desert. This is his first show in American museums, which coincides with Art Basel. Rondinone’s versatility, bordering on restlessness, sometimes come as a relief in an art world that privileges Identikit production. This exhibition promises not only video works and mirrored installations, but also a gallery of life-size clowns. The exhibition will be placed in the Bass’s renovated home, designed by the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki, which is located in South Beach.

It is on view in Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, 1 December – 27 March

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after...

editorial

Fall exhibitions – part 1

Here’s the first part of the list of some very interesting exhibitions planned for this fall.

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Doug Aitken: Electric Earth

It looks like a grove of trees, an undulating desert, with a horse in a field.  It’s a series of immersive and rhythmic video projections by Aitken, sending some intense and uncanny sensations to visitors. This first American retrospective of Californian artist will span 40,000 square feet. It includes seven of his hi-def video works, presenting one new work. Even if these installations can be seen as the biggest draw for Hollywood crowd, it also highlights some of his drawings and collages, which have the same subject, the displacement and urban life with more delicacy.

It is on view in Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 10 September – 15 January

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Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Some artists are lucky enough to get a major museum show right out of the school, while the others have to wait until they’re 100 years old. This one is an showcase for the Cuban-born painter, known for her exacting geometric compositions, made of contrasting blue and orange stripes, and sometimes of green triangles out in fields of white. The whole work has an emotional impact hidden behind those hard edges. Herrera was a student of the building arts at the University of Havana in 1938. Fidel Castro was still a child when she started.

It is on view in Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 16 September – 2 January

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Inauguration of the National Museum of African American History and Culture

British architect David Adjaye has made an amazing home for the newest member museum of the Smithsonian. It is the African American museum whose designs fixtures are made by American slaves. It has 105,000 square feet of the exhibition space, dedicated to a new narrative of black history. This museum put together the entire collection in only 13 years. Now it has around 35,000 object, which is certainly the evidence of the goodwill and impatience that they had to cope with.

It will open in Washington DC, on 24 September

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Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven

In the times when medieval mapmakers started to sketch the world, they put Levantine hub in the center of the map, referring to its importance in religion and trade. The Met’s show will take visitors to medieval Jerusalem, the main crossroad for Jews, Christians and Muslims, and also a host of visitors from faraway places like Scandinavia and India.

When medieval mapmakers sketched the known world, the city they put at the center was a Levantine hub as important for merchants as for believers. The Met’s fall blockbuster takes us to medieval Jerusalem, which was a crossroads not only for Jews, Christians and Muslims, but for a host of polytheistic visitors from as far as Scandinavia and India. According to this show’s manuscripts, prayer books and golden Torahs and Korans, this city will look like both a real city and an imaginary place.

It is on view in Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 26 September – 8 January

Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971

In late 50s, when Los Angeles still wasn’t the art world hub, the philanthropist and dealer Virginia Dwan opened doors of some important American galleries for avant garde painting. Later she became a champion of minimalism in New York. Now 84, Virginia gave her personal collection to the American people. There are also hundreds of odd works of art as a part of this show, made by artists such as Philip Guston, Agnes Martin, and Yves Klein.

It is on view in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2017.

 

image source: theguardian.com

Here’s the first part of the list of some very interesting exhibitions planned for this fall.

Doug Aitken: Electric Earth
It looks like a grove of trees, an undulating desert, with a horse in a field.  It’s a series of immersive and rhythmic...

editorial

Opening of African American museum

Next month the Smithsonian’s African American museum will open its doors, offering visitors a colorful journey through very long and complicated history of black people in American continent, written in various old and new artifacts. The major part of the exhibition will be larger installations such as the guard tower from the Angola prison in Louisiana and the Parliament-Funkadelic “mothership” which was retrieved from frontman George Clinton’s home, put  in place since this spring. Many expo materials like the guard tower had to be placed even before the main building was finished. It was transported more than 1000 miles on the huge flatbed truck.

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There are physically smaller artifacts that represent monumental events in the history of black Americans, whose details are already published by the Smithsonian Magazine, as this grand opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture is drawing near. These artifacts will present about 400 years of US society, from the ages of early barbarism of the slave trade to the significant cultural achievements of black Americans during the past few decades.

This long history is displayed chronologically, starting from the basement of the building and finishing in its third glass story. It will be all about pre-colonial and pre-enslavement African visitors, or more precisely, about the transatlantic trade which caused the immigration of more than 12 million Africans to the American continent, locked in shackles, showing a pair of 17th or 18th century iron wrist locks. Deputy director of the museum, Kinshasha Holman said: “They are probably one of the most poignant objects we have in our collection. It’s something that doesn’t ever allow us to forget that we as African Americans were born of a county built on the enslavement and the ownership of human beings.”

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Commenting these iron locks as the part of the exhibition to Smithsonian magazine, scholar and author of the historical novel “Middle Passage”, Charles Johnson said: “If these shackles could speak, they would say it took the resources of an entire society to create slave ships. Everyone in slave-trading societies, even those who never owned a slave, was implicated.”

Visitors will also get a chance to see an early form of photography captured on glass, the original ambrotype portrait of Frederick Douglass, pointing to the nation’s fight for abolition and the era of the civil war. This speaker, writer, abolitionist and freedman is on the most photographed Americans in 19th century. A scholar of African American photography at New York University, Deborah Willis told to Smithsonian magazine that Douglass thought that developing technology of photography was a very powerful instrument of racial uplift. Willis said: “Douglass believed photos ‘could challenge the racist caricatures of black people that pervaded the United States and beyond with images that communicated black humanity, self-worth and achievement’.”

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During the 1940s, the period before the civil rights era, Dr Kenneth Clark and his wife Mamie were involved in deep social science studies of the 20th century. By their famous “doll tests”, they demonstrated the way in which white supremacist idea affected black people at miraculously young age.

 

image source: theguardian.com

Next month the Smithsonian’s African American museum will open its doors, offering visitors a colorful journey through very long and complicated history of black people in American continent, written in various old and new artifacts. The major part of the...

Nature & Tech

350th anniversary of Great Fire of London

After the hot and dry weather which affected the parks and trees, the people of London may be shocked to see huge flames rising in the center of the city this weekend, which will be reflected in the Thames and licking at the dome of St Paul’s. But this time, these flames are the creations of artists who celebrate 350th anniversary of the most devastating fire in the history of London.  The flames that seemed to devour the cathedral, whose dome is designed by Sir Christopher Wren, were rising above the scorched town after this medieval original was destroyed by the Great Fire, will be shown as projections, made by the artist Martin Firrell. The baker’s shop in Pudding Lane was the spot where the Great Fire began in early hours of September 1666.

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 This London’s Burning festival, which is commissioned by the arts charity Artichoke, includes a huge amount of carefully planned and monitored real flames. It also includes a big fire garden made by the French company Carabosse, which is supposed to light up the lawn outside Tate Modern museum from dusk each evening during the festival. Probably the most eye-grabbing event will be shown on Sunday night, when a 37-metre floating sculpture of a 17th century street of wooden houses. It is designed by American artist David Best, built on to barges by hundreds of unemployed young people and schoolchildren. It will be all torched. The fire will also start at 8.30 in the evening on Sunday on the river Thames, between Waterloo bridges and Blackfriars. Organizers expect thousands of people to come and watch it from the safety of the South Bank.

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The director of Artichoke, Helen Marriage said that this festival would not only serve as memorial to the fire, but also explore challenges and issues in cities in this modern age. There will be an six-hour performance by the American based Early Morning Opera, which presents the reminder that the rise of sea level and flooding are a huge concern and certainly greater than fire. She said: “The festival is an artistic response that addresses the impact of the Great Fire of London on the city, its inhabitants and buildings, and how it emerged from the ashes and evolved to the resilient world city it is today.”

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Daylight festival events include a big version of a domino topple on Saturday, with 23000 breeze blocks which trace the course of the fire through several miles of London. Even if the fire was an usual hazard in medieval cities, the Great Fire of 1666 made the largest damage since Boudicca torched the Roman city. Only the Blitz did more damage since 1666.

Only a small number of people actually died in the fire, no more than 5, including the servant in the bakery who didn’t have courage to climb from a window upstairs. This event made thousands of people homeless, and tallies for other significant historical events, can be only measured out in grains of rice in an installation in Middle Temple.

 

Image source: theguardian.com

After the hot and dry weather which affected the parks and trees, the people of London may be shocked to see huge flames rising in the center of the city this weekend, which will be reflected in the Thames and licking at the dome of St Paul’s. But this...

Uncategorized

Fukushima exclusion zone

We all remember when the Fukushima nuclear disaster unfortunately hit Japan. All the residents within 18 miles around the plant were urged to evacuate as fast as they could. And now, Five years after the terrible even, the established exclusion zone is still closed to any outsiders. But we wouldn’t be called human beings if we hadn’t that strange desire to skip all those rules and regulations, just to satisfy our curiosity.

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Well, there is one person who just couldn’t fight that overwhelming urge to see what did it all look after the disaster. It was a 27 year old Malaysian photographer, Keow Wee Loong. He chose to risk his own life by ignoring long government procedures and illegally enter into Fukushima’s exclusion zone, successfully avoiding the strict police patrol and barricades. And of course, he took his camera there to share that odd atmosphere with all of us. He told the whole story on his Facebook page, sharing all the photos.

man-sneaks-into-fukushima-exlusion-zone-today-4

Keow remembers: “Never seen before photo of the Fukushima exclusion zone. When I enter the red zone, i can feel a burning sensation in my eyes and thick chemical smell in the air. before i went there the authority told me that i need a special permit to visit this town and it take 3-4 weeks to get the approval from the local council,, well too much bureaucracy bullshit for me..so i just sneak in the forest to avoid cops on the road … AND IT WAS AMAZING !!!!!, I still remember what is like to only have a GPS and Google map walking in the wood at 2am in the morning to get into the town of Tomioka, Okuma, Futaba and Namie.

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He recalls: “Have you ever wonder what is like in Fukushima exclusion zone now? To feel what is like to be the only person walking in the town when you have 100% full access to every shop and explore? When I was young i always had a dream like this, If I’m alone in a supermarket i will eat all the chocolate up.”

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He noticed following: “Everything is exactly where it is after the earthquake struck this town . The residents started to evacuate the town when tsunami warning came in ….hours later the Fukushima Daichi power plant exploded that lead to harmful radiation leaked.”

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“The radiation level is still very high in the red zone. Not many people seen this town for the last 5 years…is like it vanished … I can find food, money, gold, laptops and other valuable in the red zone….I’m amazed that nobody looted this town clean. Unlike Chernobyl the entire town is been looted clean. This is the difference between Chernobyl disaster and the Fukushima disaster,” Keow said.

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“Well this is the devastating effects of using nuclear energy. Resident lives in Fukushima will never be the same again… the radiation leak at red zone by the Fukushima Daichi power plant is damaging the environment and marine life in the pacific ocean , say no to nuclear energy today. Went in the town with Koji and special thanks to Sherena Ng for all her research, could not have navigated in this town without all the route and map she provided”.

We all remember when the Fukushima nuclear disaster unfortunately hit Japan. All the residents within 18 miles around the plant were urged to evacuate as fast as they could. And now, Five years after the terrible even, the established exclusion zone is still...

City Life

Art Events to See in New York

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.

Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 

It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity and heartache. “A happy-go-lucky photojournalist” who subsequently “falls in love with a lawyer” who is having a little secret, not willing to share it. MoMA’s “Gaumont: Cinéma pour tout le monde” series will be on view till September 7.

Location: 11 West 53rd Street, New York
Price: adults $12, seniors $10, students $8.
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

musee gaumont

Outdoor Cinema: “Embrace of the Serpent” at Socrates Sculpture Park

This is the film by Colombian director Ciro Guerra which will be on view in this week’s edition of the Socrates Sculpture Park’s Outdoor Cinema program. It is also nominated for an Academy Award in Best Foreign Language Film. “Embrace of the Serpent” tells the great story of two scientists and the havoc they inadvertently wreak on a community in the Amazonian area.

Location: 32-01 Vernon Boulevard
Price: Free
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

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Launch of the Studio Museum in Harlem’s “in Harlem” 

This is about four artists and four uptown parks. The Studio Museum in Harlem will open a show of public works by Kevin Beasley in Morningside Park, Simone Leigh in Marcus Garvey Park, Kori Newkirk in St. Nicholas Park, and Rudy Shepherd in Jackie Robinson Park.

Visitors will be able to see some installations, including Beasley’s sculptures called “acoustic mirrors”. Leigh’s works is influenced by the architecture of the Shona-speaking people of Zimbabwe. Newkirk’s first appearance with public sculptures will show us some reflective fringe curtains. Shepherd’s “negative energy absorbers” are the sculptures that intend to “to dispel people’s feelings of racial prejudice, violence or ordinary disdain by opening them to more compassionate aspects of their personalities.”

Location: Four Harlem Parks
Price: Free
Time: 5:00–7:00 p.m. opening celebration at Marcus Garvey Park

 

 Cao Fei at Muesum of Modern Arts PS1: Exhibition Walkthrough with Xin Wang

Cao Fei’s first museum appearance in the United States will end on August 30. Before it happens, the art historian Xin Wang will lead a guided tour to explain some of the exhibition’s finer details. The work of Cao includes photography, video and installation. It engages with a dystopian modern condition. If we’re to borrow Kathleen Massara’s words, it is: “For the artist, there is always a way out, even if it is an imaginary one.”

 Location: 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City
Price: $10 adult
Time: 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

 

news

Films To Come: Moholy-Nagy and the Moving Image at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 

During the last weekend of the summer movie program that focuses on Moholy-Nagy and the Bauhaus, visitors will see the magnificent screening of the 1936 sci-fi film called “Things To Come”. It is directed by William Cameron Menzies and it’s based on H.G. Wells’ novel which carries the same title. For this special occasion, Moholy-Nagy had to create some special effects.

Location: 1071 5th Avenue, New York (between 88th & 89th Street)
Price: adults $25, students and seniors $18
Time: 11:00 a.m.

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.
Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 
It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity...

Uncategorized

Story behind Gotan Project

Why by listening to Gotan Project we’re not involved just in music? Why the whole atmosphere has that artistic moment that goes along from the first to the last song? How did they manage to put such erotic, seductive and nostalgic flow in their music? Well, for some time tango was crying out for reinvention and the death of Astor Piazzolla in early 90s ended one great era of experimentation. Some sorts of revivals and occasional modern approaches appear in Buenos Aires from time to time, but there were some people who made clear that a creative void in the genre still existed.

Album “La Revancha del Tango” by Franco-Argentine crew called Gotan Project took tango away from the ballroom and that heavy nostalgia that appears in every step of the dance. In this case, acoustic guitar, piano, double bass and button accordion bandoneón were mixed with some dub moments, screeching violins, synthetic electronic beats and speech samples. It seems that these guys were determined to get tango into clubland.

The tango vibe that they use mostly comes from the classic, dance-friendly orchestral sound of the 1930s and 40s. All those repetitions are combined with sudden shifts in direction with melodramatic elements that go along with the contemporary electronic beat. But this is not a salon music, it is music for the lounge. The liveliest track on the album called “Last Tango in Paris” can be seen as the leastgroundedin tango, but the energy of the song “La del ruso” makes those ten musicians liveliest when doing jazz-style improvisations, it seems. In some moments, they have those smoky female vocals, like in “Una musica brutal” and Piazzolla Solanas song “Vuelvo al sur”. Some of those vocal lines remind us of the past glories of tango cancion, being essentially decorative, evoking more than it actually delivers.

Gotan Project tried and succeeded to explore tango’s suggestive qualities, the melancholy moods and romance, mixed with its local mythologies. This music takes us back to the backstreets of Buenos Aires, where elegant couples were dancing while democracy was collapsing, but it also reminds us of tango as this city’s great export. When you listen to their music, you have some sort of picture in your mind and you wonder what the film might look like. This unconventional use of tango seems trippy, slickly-executed and modern.

The ban Gotan Project got onto the music scene back in 1999 presenting their view of the innovative vibe of electro-tango. This trio of elegant men, symbolically dressed in dark suits, made a huge international success with their first album “La Revancha del Tango”. The crucial element of the Gotan Project is a French DJ Phillipe Cohen-Solal. He began his career in the movie world during the 90s, having a role of music consultant for a various film directors such as Tavernier, Mikhalkov and Lars Von Trier. By time, he also managed to make his name as a composer. He appeared on one of the first French Touch compilations, called “P.U.R.”, in 1991. Christoph H. Müller, who’s Cohen-Solal’s Gotan Project associate, made his name on the electro scene in Switzerland. Müller was always into tech elements, experimenting on machines from his early teens.

Why by listening to Gotan Project we’re not involved just in music? Why the whole atmosphere has that artistic moment that goes along from the first to the last song? How did they manage to put such erotic, seductive and nostalgic flow in their music...

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Top 10 artist of all time

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Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

He is one of the world’s artists, philosophers and greatest thinkers. In several different art fields, from science to astronomy, he succeeded to prove to be very innovative and also several centuries ahead of his contemporaries. He is seen as a key person in the birth of the European Renaissance period, which is known for new ideas, scientific discoveries and creation of beautiful art.

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Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890)

Vincent Van Gogh is an artist of exceptional talent. He was influenced by impressionists of the period, but he developed his own famous, instinctive, spontaneous style. Van Gogh is one of the most celebrated art personalities of the twentieth century. He also played a key role in the development of modern art as we know it today.

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Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564)

He was born on 6 March 1475, in a Florentine village called Caprese in Toscana. His father was a serving magistrate of the Florentine Republic and came from an influential family. His son Michelangelo did not wish to follow his father’s steps. He was mostly attracted by the artistic world. At the time, this was seen as an inferior occupation for a family of that standing. At the age of 13, Michelangelo was apprenticed to Domenico Ghirlandaio, the leading fresco wall painter in Florence. There he learned some of the basic painting techniques, but also experienced some new skills, especially in sculpting.

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Claude Monet (1840-1926)

He’s the primary inspiration for the new art movement, later called impressionism. Together with his contemporaries, he was trying to capture the light of nature on canvass in very spontaneous and vivacious style. He painted a various subjects, from urban scenes to his own beloved formal garden in later ages. Monet wanted to capture the essence of what he saw in nature, without being misguided by formal ideas of style and substance.

Spanish painter, sculptor, ceramacist and poet, who left a huge legacy behind. He was one of the founders of cubism and one of the most influential artists of the Twentieth Century as well.

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Raphael (1483–1520)

He’s one of the greatest Italian painters. Along with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael is the part of the great trinity of the High Renaissance period. He was known for his clarity of form and ability to convey beauty and perfection.

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Auguste Renoir (1841–1919)

He’s also one of the founders of impressionism, which was a revolutionary new development amongst painters in 19th century. In some stage, he moved on from impressionism after being deeply inspired by the Italian renaissance Masters.

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Jan or Johan Vermeer (1632-1675)

He’s a Dutch painter from the “Golden Age of Dutch Painting” from the baroque period. Even though he was pretty obscure during his life, in the Nineteenth Century his work transformed into light and now he is listed as one of the greatest proponents of Baroque painting. His focus on simple portraits and household scenes is the main element of his work.

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Paul Cézanne (1839-1906)

His father wished him to pursue a “respectable” career, so between 1859 and 1861 Paul Cezanne attended the law school of the University of Aix. Finally in 1861, he became disappointed with this career path and quit it to pursue his life’s passion, which was art off course.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)
He is one of the world’s artists, philosophers and greatest thinkers. In several different art fields, from science to astronomy, he succeeded to prove to be very innovative and also several centuries ahead of his...