With March being Irish Heritage month, it’s time to put your knowledge to the test.  How many of these St. Patrick’s Day facts did you already know?

St. Patrick’s Day was founded as a religious holiday:  The holiday honored St. Patrick, a fifth-century saint who brought Christianity to the Emerald Isle.

There have been parades for a long time:  On March 17, 1762, New York City threw the first recorded St. Patrick’s Day parade.  The parade was for Irish soldiers who had served in the English military.

Presidents enjoy a parade: President Harry S. Truman attended the St. Patrick’s Day parade in 1948.

March is Irish-American Heritage Month: Congress began recognizing March as American-Irish Heritage month in 1991.  The month highlights the contributions and achievements of the Irish in America.

Lots Of Irish-Americans

Large percentages of Irish Americans:  In 2014, Massachusetts claimed an Irish-American residency of 21.5%.  Following closely behind Massachusetts is New Hampshire, claiming 20.9%.

The total number of reported residents of Irish ancestry in the US is 10.4%, just over 33.1 million.  In America, this is the second highest percentage of ancestry, topped only by German Americans.

More educated:  Those claiming Irish heritage have a high rate of college and high school completion.  In fact, 93.7% of Irish Americans have high school diplomas and 35.6% of those over 25 have a bachelor’s degree.

Overall in America, only 86.9% have high school diplomas, while only 30.1% hold a bachelor’s degree.

Higher paying jobs:  Irish American households report median incomes of over $62k while the average overall salary in America is just under $54k, according to a 2014 study.

Homeowners:  Irish Americans are more likely to own their homes, with just over 68% homeowners compared to the national average of 63.1% of Americans claiming home ownership.

Find an Irish classic at a restaurant near you:  A survey taken in 2014 revealed that on St. Patrick’s Day, 235,701 restaurants offered the classic corned beef and cabbage, while just over 41,580 bars served up drinks for St. Patrick’s Day.

Many places across the United States honor the Irish: Oklahoma, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Missouri all have towns named after the shamrock and there are 16 towns named after the capital of Ireland, Dublin. Illinois, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and South Carolina all boast towns named Clover, and Minnesota also features the city of Cloverleaf.

Stocking up for St. Patrick’s Day:  In 2014, a survey revealed that 2.2 billion pounds of cabbage and 40.3 billion pounds of beef were provided farmers across the United States.

Make Your Own Irish Stew

If you want to enjoy an easy recipe for corned beef and cabbage this St. Patrick’s Day, it doesn’t mean hours over a hot stove.  Here is the best way to make this Irish classic using your crock pot:

Get Smart With St. Patty’s Day Facts

With March being Irish Heritage month, it’s time to put your knowledge to the test.  How many of these St. Patrick’s Day facts did you already know?

St. Patrick’s Day was founded as a religious holiday:  The holiday honored St. Patrick, a fifth-century saint who brought Christianity to the Emerald Isle.

There have been parades for a long time:  On March 17, 1762, New York City threw the first recorded St. Patrick’s Day parade.  The parade was for Irish soldiers who had served in the English military.

Presidents enjoy a parade: President Harry S. Truman attended the St. Patrick’s Day parade in 1948.

March is Irish-American Heritage Month: Congress began recognizing March as American-Irish Heritage month in 1991.  The month highlights the contributions and achievements of the Irish in America.

Lots Of Irish-Americans

Large percentages of Irish Americans:  In 2014, Massachusetts claimed an Irish-American residency of 21.5%.  Following closely behind Massachusetts is New Hampshire, claiming 20.9%.

The total number of reported residents of Irish ancestry in the US is 10.4%, just over 33.1 million.  In America, this is the second highest percentage of ancestry, topped only by German Americans.

More educated:  Those claiming Irish heritage have a high rate of college and high school completion.  In fact, 93.7% of Irish Americans have high school diplomas and 35.6% of those over 25 have a bachelor’s degree.

Overall in America, only 86.9% have high school diplomas, while only 30.1% hold a bachelor’s degree.

Higher paying jobs:  Irish American households report median incomes of over $62k while the average overall salary in America is just under $54k, according to a 2014 study.

Homeowners:  Irish Americans are more likely to own their homes, with just over 68% homeowners compared to the national average of 63.1% of Americans claiming home ownership.

Find an Irish classic at a restaurant near you:  A survey taken in 2014 revealed that on St. Patrick’s Day, 235,701 restaurants offered the classic corned beef and cabbage, while just over 41,580 bars served up drinks for St. Patrick’s Day.

Many places across the United States honor the Irish: Oklahoma, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Missouri all have towns named after the shamrock and there are 16 towns named after the capital of Ireland, Dublin. Illinois, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and South Carolina all boast towns named Clover, and Minnesota also features the city of Cloverleaf.

Stocking up for St. Patrick’s Day:  In 2014, a survey revealed that 2.2 billion pounds of cabbage and 40.3 billion pounds of beef were provided farmers across the United States.

Make Your Own Irish Stew

If you want to enjoy an easy recipe for corned beef and cabbage this St. Patrick’s Day, it doesn’t mean hours over a hot stove.  Here is the best way to make this Irish classic using your crock pot:

  • Fill the slow cooker with water
  • Add the corned beef and seasonings (pickling spices)
  • Cook meat all day
  • Cut up cabbage and cook over the stove for ten to fifteen minutes

With March being Irish Heritage month, it’s time to put your knowledge to the test.  How many of these St. Patrick’s Day facts did you already know?

St. Patrick’s Day was founded as a religious holiday:  The holiday honored St. Patrick, a fifth-century saint who brought Christianity to the Emerald Isle.

There have been parades for a long time:  On March 17, 1762, New York City threw the first recorded St. Patrick’s Day parade.  The parade was for Irish soldiers who had served in the English military.

Presidents enjoy a parade: President Harry S. Truman attended the St. Patrick’s Day parade in 1948.

March is Irish-American Heritage Month: Congress began recognizing March as American-Irish Heritage month in 1991.  The month highlights the contributions and achievements of the Irish in America.

Lots Of Irish-Americans

Large percentages of Irish Americans:  In 2014, Massachusetts claimed an Irish-American residency of 21.5%.  Following closely behind Massachusetts is New Hampshire, claiming 20.9%.

The total number of reported residents of Irish ancestry in the US is 10.4%, just over 33.1 million.  In America, this is the second highest percentage of ancestry, topped only by German Americans.

More educated:  Those claiming Irish heritage have a high rate of college and high school completion.  In fact, 93.7% of Irish Americans have high school diplomas and 35.6% of those over 25 have a bachelor’s degree.

Overall in America, only 86.9% have high school diplomas, while only 30.1% hold a bachelor’s degree.

Higher paying jobs:  Irish American households report median incomes of over $62k while the average overall salary in America is just under $54k, according to a 2014 study.

Homeowners:  Irish Americans are more likely to own their homes, with just over 68% homeowners compared to the national average of 63.1% of Americans claiming home ownership.

Find an Irish classic at a restaurant near you:  A survey taken in 2014 revealed that on St. Patrick’s Day, 235,701 restaurants offered the classic corned beef and cabbage, while just over 41,580 bars served up drinks for St. Patrick’s Day.

Many places across the United States honor the Irish: Oklahoma, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Missouri all have towns named after the shamrock and there are 16 towns named after the capital of Ireland, Dublin. Illinois, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and South Carolina all boast towns named Clover, and Minnesota also features the city of Cloverleaf.

Stocking up for St. Patrick’s Day:  In 2014, a survey revealed that 2.2 billion pounds of cabbage and 40.3 billion pounds of beef were provided farmers across the United States.

Make Your Own Irish Stew

If you want to enjoy an easy recipe for corned beef and cabbage this St. Patrick’s Day, it doesn’t mean hours over a hot stove.  Here is the best way to make this Irish classic using your crock pot:

  • Fill the slow cooker with water
  • Add the corned beef and seasonings (pickling spices)
  • Cook meat all day
  • Cut up cabbage and cook over the stove for ten to fifteen minutes