In today’s age, everyone is wearing workout clothing in other places such as at the workplace or for a casual occasion.  Most workout clothes are made from materials that can be easily thrown in the washer and that’s it.

That said, we all have other clothes such as cashmere sweaters or silk pants with labels that clearly say “dry clean only”.  You know you cannot throw them in your washer without damaging them, so you pack them up and head off to your dry cleaner and spend a good chunk of change to get them cleaned.

After speaking with people in the know, we discovered you do not have to run off to your dry cleaner!  There are dry clean only items that can actually be had washed!

What you don’t know, that label that reads “dry clean only” is actually a way for the manufacturers to not be held accountable if the instructions are not followed to the “T”.  The sole purpose for these labels allows the manufacturers to place the blame on the dry cleaners if an item is damaged.

The DIY DryClean Experiment

Well, back in 2014, an experiment was conducted by taking a series of items with labels for dry cleaning, washed them, and then recorded the results.  It seems cashmere, silk, and polyester did really well but tailored suits or decorative detailed tops did not do well.

Note – these items were not thrown into a washing machine with other items such as sportswear or socks.  They were washed by hand but before deciding to hand wash these items, you should perform a spot test first.

If you are a little trepidatious, test these items in an area that is inconspicuous to the eye and find out how the material reacts to water.  If you find the color is bleeding, the area you tested is shrinking or there’s puckering, you should take it to the dry cleaner.

Keep in mind, there are materials that should never be washed such as leather, suede, rayon, and polyamide fabrics unless the label clearly states the item can be washed.

Also, if you prefer to take these items to the dry cleaner but have no plans of going there every week, you can purchase a fabric freshener, like Fabreze, to keep the item fresh for a longer period of time.

In many cases items that require dry cleaning are usually more expensive to buy so it’s very understandable why you might prefer not to run the risk of washing these items and cause damage On the other hand, if you are willing to give it a shot, there are several really excellent products for hand-washing such as Woolite.

How to Dry Clean at Home

In today’s age, everyone is wearing workout clothing in other places such as at the workplace or for a casual occasion.  Most workout clothes are made from materials that can be easily thrown in the washer and that’s it.

That said, we all have other clothes such as cashmere sweaters or silk pants with labels that clearly say “dry clean only”.  You know you cannot throw them in your washer without damaging them, so you pack them up and head off to your dry cleaner and spend a good chunk of change to get them cleaned.

After speaking with people in the know, we discovered you do not have to run off to your dry cleaner!  There are dry clean only items that can actually be had washed!

What you don’t know, that label that reads “dry clean only” is actually a way for the manufacturers to not be held accountable if the instructions are not followed to the “T”.  The sole purpose for these labels allows the manufacturers to place the blame on the dry cleaners if an item is damaged.

The DIY DryClean Experiment

Well, back in 2014, an experiment was conducted by taking a series of items with labels for dry cleaning, washed them, and then recorded the results.  It seems cashmere, silk, and polyester did really well but tailored suits or decorative detailed tops did not do well.

Note – these items were not thrown into a washing machine with other items such as sportswear or socks.  They were washed by hand but before deciding to hand wash these items, you should perform a spot test first.

If you are a little trepidatious, test these items in an area that is inconspicuous to the eye and find out how the material reacts to water.  If you find the color is bleeding, the area you tested is shrinking or there’s puckering, you should take it to the dry cleaner.

Keep in mind, there are materials that should never be washed such as leather, suede, rayon, and polyamide fabrics unless the label clearly states the item can be washed.

Also, if you prefer to take these items to the dry cleaner but have no plans of going there every week, you can purchase a fabric freshener, like Fabreze, to keep the item fresh for a longer period of time.

In many cases items that require dry cleaning are usually more expensive to buy so it’s very understandable why you might prefer not to run the risk of washing these items and cause damage On the other hand, if you are willing to give it a shot, there are several really excellent products for hand-washing such as Woolite.

In today’s age, everyone is wearing workout clothing in other places such as at the workplace or for a casual occasion.  Most workout clothes are made from materials that can be easily thrown in the washer and that’s it.

That said, we all have other clothes such as cashmere sweaters or silk pants with labels that clearly say “dry clean only”.  You know you cannot throw them in your washer without damaging them, so you pack them up and head off to your dry cleaner and spend a good chunk of change to get them cleaned.

After speaking with people in the know, we discovered you do not have to run off to your dry cleaner!  There are dry clean only items that can actually be had washed!

What you don’t know, that label that reads “dry clean only” is actually a way for the manufacturers to not be held accountable if the instructions are not followed to the “T”.  The sole purpose for these labels allows the manufacturers to place the blame on the dry cleaners if an item is damaged.

The DIY DryClean Experiment

Well, back in 2014, an experiment was conducted by taking a series of items with labels for dry cleaning, washed them, and then recorded the results.  It seems cashmere, silk, and polyester did really well but tailored suits or decorative detailed tops did not do well.

Note – these items were not thrown into a washing machine with other items such as sportswear or socks.  They were washed by hand but before deciding to hand wash these items, you should perform a spot test first.

If you are a little trepidatious, test these items in an area that is inconspicuous to the eye and find out how the material reacts to water.  If you find the color is bleeding, the area you tested is shrinking or there’s puckering, you should take it to the dry cleaner.

Keep in mind, there are materials that should never be washed such as leather, suede, rayon, and polyamide fabrics unless the label clearly states the item can be washed.

Also, if you prefer to take these items to the dry cleaner but have no plans of going there every week, you can purchase a fabric freshener, like Fabreze, to keep the item fresh for a longer period of time.

In many cases items that require dry cleaning are usually more expensive to buy so it’s very understandable why you might prefer not to run the risk of washing these items and cause damage On the other hand, if you are willing to give it a shot, there are several really excellent products for hand-washing such as Woolite.