A blend of road-worthy and rugged, the self-balancing electric scooter boasts a quick-start functionality and speeds of up to 25 miles per hour which is cool for scooting around and through traffic in crowded cities for hours, all in a single charge.

For those already into other private scooter-share programs like Lime or Bird, but are dissatisfied with having to hunt for them, this device is a phenomenal boost in durability, personalization, maneuverability, speed, and acceleration.

Meet The “Stator”

Nathan Allen, a California-based product designer developed the Stator with all these demands in mind. It has oversized wheels connected to a single-tube frame and a single, wraparound handlebar with an electronic control unit (turned on by a wireless RFID tag or standard key).

Part of the design’s charm is its modularity. Made up of components that can be personalized and swapped, comprising of custom racks and rack bags, headlights, phone chargers and holders, seat, brake lights.

It’s powered by a 1000W geared motor and a 20-Ah, 48-volt, lithium-ion battery pack tucked into the baseboard. Different power settings can be used to get better performance or equalize the energy usage.

It won’t be easy to lug around at 90 pounds, but if you’re an urban street cruiser then that shouldn’t be a hassle. The extra weight helps provide extra features, like regenerative brakes paired with front-wheel hydraulic disk braking. It’s still a prototype, but its creator hopes to put up models for sale in the near future.

New High-Powered Self-Balancing Scooter

A blend of road-worthy and rugged, the self-balancing electric scooter boasts a quick-start functionality and speeds of up to 25 miles per hour which is cool for scooting around and through traffic in crowded cities for hours, all in a single charge.

For those already into other private scooter-share programs like Lime or Bird, but are dissatisfied with having to hunt for them, this device is a phenomenal boost in durability, personalization, maneuverability, speed, and acceleration.

Meet The “Stator”

Nathan Allen, a California-based product designer developed the Stator with all these demands in mind. It has oversized wheels connected to a single-tube frame and a single, wraparound handlebar with an electronic control unit (turned on by a wireless RFID tag or standard key).

Part of the design’s charm is its modularity. Made up of components that can be personalized and swapped, comprising of custom racks and rack bags, headlights, phone chargers and holders, seat, brake lights.

It’s powered by a 1000W geared motor and a 20-Ah, 48-volt, lithium-ion battery pack tucked into the baseboard. Different power settings can be used to get better performance or equalize the energy usage.

It won’t be easy to lug around at 90 pounds, but if you’re an urban street cruiser then that shouldn’t be a hassle. The extra weight helps provide extra features, like regenerative brakes paired with front-wheel hydraulic disk braking. It’s still a prototype, but its creator hopes to put up models for sale in the near future.

A blend of road-worthy and rugged, the self-balancing electric scooter boasts a quick-start functionality and speeds of up to 25 miles per hour which is cool for scooting around and through traffic in crowded cities for hours, all in a single charge.

For those already into other private scooter-share programs like Lime or Bird, but are dissatisfied with having to hunt for them, this device is a phenomenal boost in durability, personalization, maneuverability, speed, and acceleration.

Meet The “Stator”

Nathan Allen, a California-based product designer developed the Stator with all these demands in mind. It has oversized wheels connected to a single-tube frame and a single, wraparound handlebar with an electronic control unit (turned on by a wireless RFID tag or standard key).

Part of the design’s charm is its modularity. Made up of components that can be personalized and swapped, comprising of custom racks and rack bags, headlights, phone chargers and holders, seat, brake lights.

It’s powered by a 1000W geared motor and a 20-Ah, 48-volt, lithium-ion battery pack tucked into the baseboard. Different power settings can be used to get better performance or equalize the energy usage.

It won’t be easy to lug around at 90 pounds, but if you’re an urban street cruiser then that shouldn’t be a hassle. The extra weight helps provide extra features, like regenerative brakes paired with front-wheel hydraulic disk braking. It’s still a prototype, but its creator hopes to put up models for sale in the near future.