Tag - Art

editorial

Fall exhibitons – part 2

5

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium

This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after what the artist switched to the tropicalist spirit of the 1960s, presenting wearable capes, tents full of hay and agitrprop against Brazil’s ruling junta. Many figurines in Brazilian art have denounced the ejection of Dilma Rouseff, as an opponent of the military regime, as a modern time coup.

It is on view in Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 1 October – 2 January

6

Monet: The Early Years

During 1920s this painter, who became a synonym for impressionism studied his two old friends and colleagues. It was his mentor Eugene Boudin, whose amazing seascapes passed really well within the new bourgeoisie, and his good friend Edouard Manet, whose flat nudes caused a scandal at the Salon at the time. This show is dedicated to the early work of Claude Monet, including his “Luncheon on the Grass” and his still unbelievable “Magpie”

It is on view in Kimbell Museum of Art, Fort Worth, 16 October – 29 January

7

Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910 – 1950

After the Mexican revolution, a new painterly vocabulary appeared, thanks to country’s artists. It was a fusion of European modernism and local folklore traditions, which later became a global phenomenon. This huge show includes paintings by Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo alongside photography, books, and graphic design. There are also some the country’s most awesome murals, created by masters such as Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. It’s the most important 20th-century Mexican art exhibition in the U.S. since the second world war.

It is on view in Philadelphia Museum of Art, 25 October – 8 January

8

Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation

This a huge treasury of sculptures, textiles and gold, which travels from Germany to the U.S. for this historical exhibition, exactly 500 years after this religious reformer nailed his 95 theses to a church door in Wittenberg. Later, some iconoclastic Protestants made Luther endorsed painted images in a manner of encouraging piety, and some German painters, such as Lucas Cranach the Elder, who made magnificent narrative tableaux that jibed with Luther’s preaching. The show will also display bric-a-brac from the Luther family home, with jewelry and furniture.

It is on view in Minneapolis Institute of Art, 30 October – 15 January

Ugo Rondinone: Good Evening Beautiful Blue

This is the exhibition of Swiss master, known for glowing rainbows and stacks of fluorescent rocks in the Nevada desert. This is his first show in American museums, which coincides with Art Basel. Rondinone’s versatility, bordering on restlessness, sometimes come as a relief in an art world that privileges Identikit production. This exhibition promises not only video works and mirrored installations, but also a gallery of life-size clowns. The exhibition will be placed in the Bass’s renovated home, designed by the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki, which is located in South Beach.

It is on view in Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, 1 December – 27 March

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after...

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Banksy artwork destroyed?

Banksy’s artwork that satirizes western government surveillance is removed, with suspicions that it has been destroyed. His Spy Booth mural was made in April 2014 on the wall of a house in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. It has three secret agents in trenchcoats who use modern devices to spy on people’s conversations at a telephone box next to the wall. This house with a famous mural is actually located just a couple of miles from GCHQ, which is the home of UK government’s surveillance operations. Another “coincidence” is that the mural appeared just few months after Edward Snowden’s shocking uncovering story about widespread phone-tapping by western governments.

During the weekend, there were rumors that the mural had been purposely destroyed. Social media were flooded with photos of tarpaulins and scaffolding that covers the wall of the house. These photographs reveal that the wall was stripped back to the brickwork, with a pile of rubble down on the ground. This mural also had a protected status. So, it is still unclear if this mural was destroyed during the work on the building or removed beforehand.

In January this year, this house was listed for sale for £210,000, with the note which says that urgent work needed to be done on the house. There is still a possibility that this mural was taken down to enable the beginning of the works. But the funny thing is that, in February 2015, Cheltenham council granted a planning permission, saying that the mural was protected and shouldn’t be removed without the approval of the city’s council.

The leader of Cheltenham council, Steve Jordan explained that these works began with intentions to repair the plasterwork on the house, and that he wasn’t aware of the removal of this mural. He also said that the enforcement notice for the work was issued even before Banksy printed this mural. He concluded: “It [the artwork] is protected by a listing. I will have a look at what the situation is, certainly.” We all know that most of Banksy’s works grabbed huge attention, causing the controversy for years. One piece of wall with Banksy’s painting was cut out and shipped to the United States had to be returned to Britain, which was ordered by a high court judge last year.

“Art Buff” is a painting that shows a woman who stares at an empty plinth, created in September 2014. Just like the “Spy Booth” mural, it was constantly vandalized, shortly after it was painted. The similar controversy was caused in 2014, after Banksy made a work called “Mobile Lovers” which was showing a couple embracing while check their mobile phones, on the wall of a youth club in Bristol. David Stinchcombe, the owner of the club, moved the painting in the club, trying to earn money on donations from the people who wanted to see it. At the time he even received some death threats. Later that year, Banksy wrote a letter to Stinchcombe which declared the painting to be an original, allowing the club to have it.

Banksy’s artwork that satirizes western government surveillance is removed, with suspicions that it has been destroyed. His Spy Booth mural was made in April 2014 on the wall of a house in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. It has three secret agents in...

City Life

Talks in the Cuban Art

The conversation with Elizabeth Cerejido, organizer of the Dialogues in Cuban Art project, that is explained as a week-long artist exchange that took place in Havana last year and Miami this spring. Cerejido described the exchange on a more personal and private level, while she’s looking for the project’s next phases.

She talked about activities scheduled for the Havana group in Miami this spring, and gave an explanation of a studio visit.

They made a visit with Maria Martinez-Canas. Ceredijo claims that she is one of the most important artists in Miami. She has numerous awards that were given to her by galleries and museums all around the world. Her work is deeply connected with Cuban history, and whose cultural identity is profoundly Cuban American.

They had a merging of various narratives that everyone shared, in different ways though. There was a common interest to everyone, artists and cultural producers but also as Cubans.

María provided a highly, well-organized presentation about her work and progress. She showed her collage negatives from which she printed out much of her famous work from the 1990s, like the Totems.

She also showed some materials from the Jose Gomez Sicre collection, which she is in the process of documenting. There were also some photographs and letters that fascinated the group.

Her typical day goes about something like this: The bus would wait for the group outside the hotel at 9 a.m. sharp. She claims that even though gathering people can be fun it can also be really stressful. Sometimes their work would last until late in the night.

She gave one day as an example. There was a tour that was led by Cesar Trasobares that included visits to public art works that have become highly popular in Miami, such as Ed Ruscha permanent installation at the main library that is situated in downtown of Miami and Claes Oldenburg that is also in the same area. Cesar is an ex executive director of Metro Dade’s Art in Public Places Program, and he would talk to the group about the inside stuff that happens in the program, where do funds come from, and discussed the political and logistical issues that happen.

After downtown Miami, they would go to Little Havana and have lunch at a traditional Cuban cafe, El Rey de las Fritas (Many didn’t now what a frita was it’s part of Cuban exile cuisine.).

And then they would end up at the Cuban Memorial Boulevard. Cesar talked about Ana Mendieta’s work that is carved on one of the boulevard’s ceiba trees, he would also put her in work in the context of the politically filled space in which it’s situated. Casa del Preso Politico is close to the boulevard we were next to, that’s the place where Afro-Cubans leave their offerings- at the base of that very ceiba tree, or the statue of a Virgin that is not that far away from the tree. That particular area witnesses Cuban painful political history.

The conversation with Elizabeth Cerejido, organizer of the Dialogues in Cuban Art project, that is explained as a week-long artist exchange that took place in Havana last year and Miami this spring. Cerejido described the exchange on a more personal and...

Entertainment

Art in Olympic Games

As we all know that it is the time of new Olympic Games that just started in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, there are maybe some interesting facts that we didn’t know, like the bound between Olympics and arts. Yes, it really happened almost 100 years ago and here is the short story about those historic events.

The Venice Biennale still carries the name of “the Olympics of art”, but actually between 1912 and 1948, writers, musicians, painters, sculptors and architects were a part of real Olympic Games. The founder of the IOC, from which modern Olympics evolved in 1896, Baron Pierre de Coubertin thought that sports and arts always had a strong bound, according to the New York Times.

Talking to Smithsonian Magazine, the author of “The Forgotten Olympic Art Competitions”, Richard Stanton said: “He was raised and educated classically, and he was particularly impressed with the idea of what it meant to be a true Olympian—someone who was not only athletic, but skilled in music and literature. He felt that in order to recreate the events in modern times, it would be incomplete to not include some aspect of the arts.”

Anyway, the idea didn’t took much sympathy within the Olympic committee, and it stayed that way until the 1912 Stockholm Olympic Games in Sweden, where the medals were finally awarded in artistic disciplines. The resistance was huge, as the former Olympic board thought that sporting achievements could be measured in simple metrics such as time and distance, while the evaluation of artworks seemed quite impossible and very subjective at time.

Another problem with arts in Olympic Games was that all the works created had to be related with sport. It surely limited the freedom of art, pushing it in a direction of displaying successful athletes and the respect for all sporting achievements. In early stages, the special requirement was that all the participants should be amateurs, which excluded the option of professional artists participating in the competition.  It means that some of the greatest characters in art world like Pablo Picasso and Frida Kahlo couldn’t take part in it. It all resulted in very amateurish atmosphere at the end.

In 1948, the Olympic art events finally disappeared from the international competition due to dwindling interest of public, according to the Huffington Post. The official Olympic records “removed” all the arts medals and this kind of events was reshaped into non-competitive exhibitions during the period of the competition.

Which is a really interesting fact is that the Russian aristocrat with American citizenship, Walter Winans, was the only Olympian to win medals in both sporting and arts competition. He won the silver medal for team U.S.A. in the shooting event “Team Running Deer—Single Shot” and a gold medal in sculpture for his work “An American Trotter”, both in 1912. No matter what, this story of the art Olympics really makes a fascinating piece of sports history. And, at least we still have the Venice Biannale to carry the word “Olympic” in its nickname.

As we all know that it is the time of new Olympic Games that just started in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, there are maybe some interesting facts that we didn’t know, like the bound between Olympics and arts. Yes, it really happened almost 100 years ago and...

Entertainment

Documentary about North Korea cancelled

American Museum of Modern Art board announced that they have wrongly canceled the New York premiere of “Under the Sun,” a documentary about North Korea, after it has been heavily criticized by North Korea and Russia.

It is a troubling look at the Asian state by the Russian filmmaker Vitaly Mansky. This film supposed to be shown at the museum’s 2016 Doc Fortnight festival in February this year, but festival organizer and an assistant curator at Museum of Modern Arts, Sally Berger, expressed concern in January about launching the documentary. The problem was as she stumbled upon an article saying that any organization who was willing to show the film, would also risk retribution from North Korea.

 

After couple of days, she eventually said to the documentary’s distributor that the schedule has been changed, leaving that film out of the list. “It just simply came in too late to review all the possible ramifications of showing it here at MoMA,” she wrote.

On withdrawing the film, the chief curator of MoMA’s film department, Rajendra Roy said wrote: “‘Under the Sun’ is a remarkable documentary that was wrongly disinvited. The decision was made by the festival’s curator without my knowledge or input.” Later on, Ms. Berger was fired by the organization, and the spokeswoman for the MoMA, Margaret Doyle didn’t wanted to comment anything.

Even if there are many documentaries about North Korea, very few of them had the permission of the country’s government. The director Mansky spent two years negotiating with North Korea before succeeding to make a contract that allowed their government to give the script and cast, assign helpers to direct Mansky’s film crew and approve the final version of the film at the end.

North Korea was listed in the schedule with five other producers and representatives from Russia, Latvia, Germany and Mansky’s production company, Vertov Films. The quality of this film is hugely in way that Mansky chose to shoot it, regarding that all the scenes were staged by North Koreans. His solution was simply to let his cameras run all day, capturing everything. Finally he captured the whole staging phase, revealing one side of general manipulation in that country. In some point, North Korea cancelled his final trip to the capital Pyongyang, where he planned to finish the last part of story. He said that at the time he had only a third of the total footage planned. So, he gave his best to edit the existing material into a 90 minute documentary.

“Under the Sun” was received nicely on the international festival circuit, even managing to win some awards and good drawing reviews. Many saw this film as a study in state propaganda and the tough truth that leaves those staged borders. But, the documentary was heavily criticized by both North Korean and Russian government. North Korea tried to convince Russia to destroy all the material and even punish Vitaly Mansky. Russia’s Ministry of Culture, which firstly helped financing the documentary, later asked for its name to be removed from the credits. As Mr. Mansky didn’t want to make those changes, the Ministry has not granted permission for the documentary to be shown in Russia.

American Museum of Modern Art board announced that they have wrongly canceled the New York premiere of “Under the Sun,” a documentary about North Korea, after it has been heavily criticized by North Korea and Russia.
It is a troubling look at the Asian...

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Sepe and Chazme finished “Deaf phone” in Italy

On the streets of Assago Sepe and Chazme just completed their cooperation for the latest Start festival. “Deaf Phone” is a product that truly reflects the input of these two artists and their cleverness in using light, color palette and brush strokes. Combined with Chazme’s architectural elements, Sepe achieved really strong atmosphere in this masterpiece.

It is fascinating to see how this piece is showing this flamboyant world in it’s absurd and grotesque.

Sepe’s perception on today’s reality highlight the paradoxical circumstance in which are present day social orders: sharing photographs of puppies while all people’s learning has been assembled in one spot, online network expanding entertainment and the steady requirement for stimulation or prompt fulfillment. He picked the expression “grotesque” to qualify both this time and his work and gave us a key to comprehend what his specialty is about.

Once the rapprochement has been made, the artist’s style shows up a bit clearer to our brain. The twisting of bodies, both fit and fat, hypertrophied and atrophied, indistinguishable and one of a kind upgraded the sentiment uncanny as though the observer were immersed in some sort of present day and Kafkaesque world in its preposterousness.

Sepe’s is identified with graffiti and after that street art scene in Poland since 1996. During that time he painted numerous surfaces in different nations, for example, Germany, France, Russia, Indonesia, Turkey, USA or England and did numerous joint efforts with other painters, for example, in this case Chazme, Lump and the ETAM Cru.
In order to work he mostly uses spray paint but may uses paint brushes and paint roller also. His style is conspicuous: hues are truly dim and gives a nightmarish measurement to his enormous fine art; orange, dark, red, dark blue and purple blended with a cartoonish drawing expand the possibility of the naive and disabused impression that comes from his work.

The artist tells us that singularity is by all accounts very nearly termination. His characters don’t “exist” any longer yet “co-exist” as a society and must be characterized as a mass. The idea of humankind and unicity is continually questioned and is plainly appeared in his piece “crash test dummies” in which individuals in an ordinary life routine are dressed like accident test shams.

Sepe grasps the possibility of the painter that needs to appear and reprimand issues of today’s reality.

It is essential that workmanship continues being both a medium of self-expression and an eye-opener for observers that see the work.

In the space between creation, animals and commentators, the artist propose another style and an abnormal world in which every single one of us may build up another state of mind about our general public.

image source: streetartnews.com

 

On the streets of Assago Sepe and Chazme just completed their cooperation for the latest Start festival. “Deaf Phone” is a product that truly reflects the input of these two artists and their cleverness in using light, color palette and brush...

Entertainment

Fanzine – The lost art! Part 2 – Punk fanzines

Fanzine – the lost art (part 2)

Our story about fanzines as nonofficial publication made by fans continues in this article. As it was mostly used to explore certain musical genre, we chose to explore a little bit about punk subculture, which can be divided into several groups. The best way talk about this genre would be to separate them by countries like United States and Great Britain and to add a modern fanzine, the art of 21st century.

United Kingdom

As the young people in Great Britain weren’t really ravished by the established print media at the time, they easily accepted the punk subculture, which was a countercultural alternative. It quickly entered the world of fanzines. Deptford punk fan Mark Perry was the first one to make a zine. It was called “Sniffin’ Glue” and it is still the best known today. This fanzine was produced in 12 photocopied issues. The first one started following the English debut of the Ramones, in July 1976.

Ohter famous British fanzines at the time were Blam!, Chainsaw, New Crimes, Vague, Bombsite, Wool City Rocker, Burnt Offering, Jamming, Artcore Fanzine, Love and Molotov Cocktails, To Hell With Poverty, ENZK, Juniper beri-beri, No Cure,Communication Blur New Youth, Peroxide, , Rox, Grim Humour, Spuno and Cool Notes. In this huge amount of publications,  Tony Fletcher’s Jamming was the most successful one, reaching the mainstream distribution on the national level, as a serious magazine in the country.

United States

In the United States, “Flipside” and “Slash” would be the most important punk fanzines from Los Angeles scene, both starting in 1977. During 1977 in Australia, Clinton Walker and Bruce Milne mixed two of their punk separate zines “Plastered Press” and “Suicide Alley” to create a huge one called “Pulp”. Milne later went by himself to create the “Cassette zine” with Fast Forward, in 1980.

In 1976, “Punk” was made in New York and had a huge role in popularizing punk rock as the term for the subculture, genre of music and the bands represented in the fanzine. Couple of years late, the major punk fanzine called “Maximum RocknRoll” was made, with more than 300 issues. It partially resulted in popularizing punk in the late 1980s, as the popularity of such bands as Sonic Youth, Nirvana, Fugazi, Bikini Kill, Green Day and The Offspring, grew enormously. In that time, various, important punk zines were published, such as Punk Planet, Razorcake, Tail Spins, Sobriquet, Profane Existence and Slug and Lettuce.

One of the early American punkzines, called “Search and Destroy” even managed to become the very influential subcultural magazine “Re/Search”. Some fanzines from the 80s, like “No Class” and “Ugly American” had their renaissance by placing all past content online for free and also continuing to work on new stuff. During the last period, Californian “Suburban Rebels” could be considered as leading the Punk fanzine of modern age.

Punk fanzines after the year 2000

In the United Kingdom, “Reason To Believe” and “Fracture” were the most influent fanzines in the early 2000s, but unfortunately they both lasted till the late 2003. The next important punkzine was “Rancid News”, which changed its name to “Last Hours” after ten year existence, publishing 7 new issues under the new title before disappearing from the scene. Although “Last Hours” still exists as a webzine, it has changed its focus, becoming more anti-authoritarian movement. There are also numerous small punkzines in the UK today.

 

 

Fanzine – the lost art (part 2)
Our story about fanzines as nonofficial publication made by fans continues in this article. As it was mostly used to explore certain musical genre, we chose to explore a little bit about punk subculture, which can be divided...

Humans Are Awesome

“Staging Architecture” by Barbara Kasten

Barbara Kasten: Stages is the first major survey of the work of artist Barbara Kasten. Mostly known by her brilliance in photography, Kasten was also expanding her creative area, exploring many different disciplines, including painting, sculpture, theater, textile, and installation over the past 40 years. This four-decade period is marked by light, abstraction and architectonic form, so “Stages” is the exhibition that follows Kasten’s practice within current conversations around sculpture and photography. Also, her main interest is in the interplay between three- and two – dimensional forms, her engagement with staging and the role of the prop and obviously her cross-disciplinary process. Many modern artists were highly influenced by her aesthetic, her innovative approach to abstraction and materiality.

After months in United States, “Staging Architecture” started the European tour at Kadel Willborn in Dusseldorf this January, bringing to Europe for the first time the series “Architectural Sites” made between 1984-1987 and focused on major buildings in the U.S.

Kasten’s photography is made through a performative practice where she creates large, intricate, and extensive installations, then restages them using colored lighting, and photographs the results. The exhibition also includes a site specific film work entitled Sideways II” (2016) which was on view in dialogue with Architectural Sites” (1984-87).

Barbara Kasten is a Chicago based artist, trained as a painter and textile artist, receiving her MFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts (CCAC) in Oakland in 1970. She studied with one of the earliest fiber artists Trude Guermonprez, a former teacher at Black Mountain College. In early 1970s she received a Fulbright to travel to Poznan, Poland, to work with  sculptor Magdalena Abakanowicz. During the 1980s she was working on Constructs” series, where she implements elements such as metal, mirrors, mesh and wire into installations produced specifically for the camera.

Kasten was one of the first artists to use Polaroid’s new large format cameras at the time, and using these she made many of her best known works. In 1980s she started working with large architectural spaces such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta and the World Financial Center in New York. Those new postmodern buildings were shown via the cinematic lighting, mirrors, and fabrications that were part of her monumental productions. She also created some dramatic displays by intervening on ancient ruins.

All that experimentation with constructions, sets, and installations at the human scale, gave a unity to her artwork, even when experimenting with multiple processes, from cyanotypes and Polaroids to Cibachromes and video installations.

Kasten’s photographs of studio constructions and cinematic stagings are included in major museum collections such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

“Stagging Architecture” was firstly shown in United States in 2015 and finally during this year, viewers from Europe were introduced to the work of this amazing and creative woman artist.

Barbara Kasten: Stages is the first major survey of the work of artist Barbara Kasten. Mostly known by her brilliance in photography, Kasten was also expanding her creative area, exploring many different disciplines, including painting, sculpture, theater...

Humans Are Awesome

Impressive installations by Klaus Pinter

As an artistic genre of three-dimensional works that are designed to transform our perception of a space, installations play huge part in modern art today. At first, it was linked with interior spaces specifically, considering exterior interventions as public art or land art. But today, the difference between these two is slowly disappearing. The latest work of European artist Pinter really came to attention lately, as the public was introduced to some innovative space interventions.

Austrian artist Klaus Pinter dedicated his time to explore the potential our surrounding with his floating installations that deepen our imagination. His giant works seem fluid, soft and mechanical at the same time, often placed in mid air. They look so out of this world, so odd, made as a combination of various textures and materials like nylon and plastic. Many people see these installations as flying machines, futuristic buildings or even angelic cocoons.

His works even change our perception of well known places around the world like Seine waterway in Paris or Pantheon in Rome. In 2002, he had an exhibition called “Rebounds” at the Pantheon, he mixed art with history and culture by rolling two huge spheres into an impressive Ancient Roman building. The building consisted of one sphere which was placed on the ground and the other one mounted, creating the atmosphere of floatiness, reflecting an distorted image, reminding us of some Escher’s drawings.

Actually, he was inspired by Plato’s ideas, referring to his speculations on the nature of human beings and the physical world. Klaus Pinter says that the poet inspired the inventor in him to start creating all these “pneumatic” structures. He always stimulates the spectators with his research of contrast. In this theater of experiment, he mixes traditional motives, abstract citations and delicate exercises. Some even say that his interventions on ancient heroes and historic personalities make them quit their usual movement and collide with more modern statues, creating an image of metamorphosis which happens in normal everyday life.

Even if the installation came to the big scene in 1970’s, its roots can be identified in some works of earlier artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Kurt Schwitters. The intention of the artist is paramount in much later installation art, inspired by the conceptual art of the 1960s. Not focusing on form, this was a sort of departure from traditional sculpture. Early non-Western installation art can be seen in works made by the Gutai group in Japan in 1950s, which later influenced American installation pioneers like Allan Kaprow.

Finally, installation/environmental art takes produces more sensory experience, rather than pointing the focus on a neutral wall or exposing isolated objects, placed on a pedestal. This surely changes the drawn line between art and life, leaving space and time as its only dimensional constants.

American painter, assemblagist and a pioneer in establishing the concepts of performance art, Allan Kaprow once said: “if we bypass ‘art’ and take nature itself as a model or point of departure, we may be able to devise a different kind of art… out of the sensory stuff of ordinary life.”

As an artistic genre of three-dimensional works that are designed to transform our perception of a space, installations play huge part in modern art today. At first, it was linked with interior spaces specifically, considering exterior interventions as public...

Entertainment

Hong Yi inspired many to try themselves in Food Art

Two years ago, Malaysian artist Hong Yi, also known as “Red”, has started a food art project on Instagram, where she quickly gained thousands of followers. For each day during the month, Hong Yi posted a different artistic image made entirely out of food, with only a white plate as her backdrop. She started the project in order to push herself to be more creative, as she wrote to her followers.

A 31 day mission Malaysian artist & architect Hong Yi created a daily fun illustration with her food, saying that her main two parameters were: 1. an image entirely comprised of food 2. a white plate as only backdrop.

The project has been documented heavily around the web. We must say that it influenced a lot of artists to explore this new area of art, so today we have lots of those involved in food art.

Hong Yi spent about 8 years studying and working in Australia. She graduated from university of Melbourne with a masters degree in architecture in 2010, and after that she worked for a Australian architecture firm in Shanghai.

After six months of living in Shanghai, China, she started painting portraits of iconic Chinese people and shared them with friends in Australia and Malaysia by posting them onto her blog/facebook. Inspired by her surroundings and the range of affordable materials available from wholesale markets, it was here Red completed her first unconventional work, a portrait of Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei made entirely out of sunflower seeds. A wave of innovative artworks ensued, including a portrait of Adele using 1500 melted tea lights, Aung San Suu Kyi with dyed carnations, a hanging structure of Jackie Chan using chopsticks. The use of materials in bulk in her project alludes to the globalization and mass production in China and Asia. Her Yao Ming portrait done with a basketball, uploaded onto youtube, was the first project that gave her a significant amount of media exposure. People from around the world started supporting her work immediately.

Another piece of art inspired by Shanghai’s suburbs. “When I first moved to Shanghai, I stumbled upon an old residential alleyway and saw bamboo sticks poking out of windows with laundry hanging on them, waving in the air. To me, that was incredibly beautiful”, Hong Yi said. So she decided to make Chinese film maker Zhang Yimou’s portrait, using 750 pairs of black, gray and white socks and pins. Red chose Zhang because she liked how beautifully he portrays the Chinese tradition in his movies.

 

“My “creativity with food” series has helped me push the limits of my creativity, and has taught me to work within the confines of a very small area” she said. “I’ve learned to slice, dice, stir, boil…who would have thought I’d need that to do art!” she added.

Nowadays, we can find this type of art on many blogs around the internet. Why did it influence so quickly? Probably because we all love food and even more when it looks good.

 

 

Two years ago, Malaysian artist Hong Yi, also known as “Red”, has started a food art project on Instagram, where she quickly gained thousands of followers. For each day during the month, Hong Yi posted a different artistic image made entirely out...

Entertainment

Funny & cool vandalism?

We all know that vandalism is dangerous, mostly illegal and wrong. But sometimes we come across some very funny and cool looking acts of vandalism on the street. When it’s done smartly and well placed, it often makes us laugh and even approve it.  Actually there are people who would say – “Wow, you definitely made my day.” and they are happy to share these art, or vandalism, (call it what you want) with other people, so let’s see some of the most interesting vandalism photos that we picked for you…

One of the most common vandalism acts can be seen on traffic signs. People change the whole meaning of the sign by adding some extra words to it or removing some letters from the sentence. Sometimes, if possible, the images and photos of celebrities are added to traffic signs, changing the context totally.

These “artists” also help us see the image of the signs differently. If those objects on the sign look like something else, they’ll make sure that we also see it. The result can be totally hilarious, it just makes you feel better!

Most of you know good what British youngsters think of the whole CCTV story, that it’s invasion of their privacy, ruining someone’s business and not actually tackling crime! Some of them even managed to make a graffiti jokes and sticker some signs for high security cameras placed on buildings across the England and other U.K. countries.

Most of this bizarre art can be also seen in public toilets and elevators, on train stations, bus stations, or other public areas. It’s usually written on the wall, added to some already existed sign, or a printed image that changes the context of some sign or object totally. Vending machines, billboards and toilets, are also the victims of this freedom of expression. Al Pacino selling coke in vending machine did make us laugh loudly…

Probably the most interesting kind of vandalism is adding the 3d objects to traffic signs making them the center of attention even if they’re mostly placed by highways and other roads. There are also examples of these in various construction sites in urban areas. People see something in pieces of concrete and wire, so it quickly becomes the whole image and sometimes the real piece of art.

According to Wikipedia:” Vandalism is action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private propert. The term includes criminal damage such as graffiti and defacement directed towards any property without permission of the owner. The term finds its roots in an Enlightenment view that the Germanic Vandals were a uniquely destructive people”

But is it really that way?

Imagine yourself returning home from work tired, nervous and you accidentally notice some of these works of art, you immediately get in the mood, maybe get inspired to do something like this, to share some of your funny thoughts with other people, to make someone laugh…

The question is – “Why do we approve vandalism which is funny?”

We all know that vandalism is dangerous, mostly illegal and wrong. But sometimes we come across some very funny and cool looking acts of vandalism on the street. When it’s done smartly and well placed, it often makes us laugh and even approve it...