Tag - Brown

Celebs

Chris Brown is About to Face Bankruptcy

We all know that Chris Brown is a big spender. His ex-manager said that his reckless spending habits will soon dry out his bank accounts and that he is getting too close to bankruptcy. If he doesn’t act quickly, a financial disaster could come even this year.

Michael Guirguis, Chris’s former manager, testified on the court that the star is spending an enormous amount of his money and that it is way beyond his means. He also said that at this pace, Chris won’t be able to get out of this situation and that his bankruptcy is inevitable.

Court paperwork is saying that the biggest problem is that Brown is spending more than he is earning by far. If you combine that with his unpaid bills and debt that is getting bigger and bigger, a major financial disaster doesn’t seem that weird.

His manager Michael Guirguis, who in the business world goes by “Mike G”, has seen these large amounts of money being spent with his own eyes. On December 22nd, Guirguis outlined Brown’s great amount of unpaid debt and his serious spending habits in a sworn statement for LA Superior Court.

“Brown’s Spending Habits and Solvency” is the title of one section of Guirguis’s testimony where he explains some aspects of Brown’s finances. The testimony says:” I have worked with Brown since 2012 and have witnessed firsthand Brown’s lavish spending habits. For example, Brown’s music video shoots often have exceeded his record label’s budget and Brown has paid out-of-pocket for the additional costs. These were, at times, six-figure overages.”

Brown also has a private jet and when it comes to traveling, the only transportation vehicle is that jet. Guirguis said:”Brown also travels on private jets domestically and internationally, and spends anywhere from $50,000 to $200,000 per trip.  He pays for this himself.” Another interesting fact is that Drai’s Nightclub in Las Vegas, who paid Brown almost 3 million dollars a year, fired him in July 2016 for unprofessional and violent behavior. This was just one of Brown’s self-destructing and self- sabotaging acts. On that matter, Guirguis stated in the testimony:”In July 2016, Brown was fired from his Las Vegas residency at Drai’s Nightclub.  Drai’s had paid Brown approximately $3 million a year.  Prior to terminating Brown, Drai’s Management Group, LLC had sent a letter warning Brown about his behavior.” Should we say that this gig was easy millions?

Guirguis gave the testimony because NiteVision, his management team, and he are suing Chris Brown after a violent argument between them. To make it short, after a disagreement, Brown attacked Guirguis, and the result was a break-up and subsequent lawsuit. Guirguis has a concern that if he wins at this court, Brown won’t be able to pay after all. We are talking millions in damages. Guirguis said:”As NiteVision’s chief executive officer, I am concerned about Brown’s future solvency and his inability to satisfy a judgment in NiteVision’s favor.  NiteVision will suffer great or irreparable injury if Brown is allowed to continue dissipating funds that are unlikely to be replenished through new sources of income.”

Chris Brown is not the only musician who managed to spend all of his money and drive himself to bankruptcy. Among many others, that list includes Toni Braxton, DMX, Lauryn Hill, Scott Storch, Rick Ross and 50 Cent.

LA Superior Court will proceed with a trial against Chris Brown on March 7th.

We all know that Chris Brown is a big spender. His ex-manager said that his reckless spending habits will soon dry out his bank accounts and that he is getting too close to bankruptcy. If he doesn’t act quickly, a financial disaster could come even this...

Humans Are Awesome

Trisha Brown Legacy

As the painters leave behind a visual legacy and the music of composers is played by many generations, the work of modern dance choreographers, who tend to create movements without names, often silence, can easily fade and be forgotten. If they don’t perform shows frequently, their techniques and intellectual value can unfortunately disappear. Trying to fight that kind of destiny, the Trisha Brown Dance Company’s board decided to implement some new steps into their dance, hoping that it would be even expanded onto other dance troups.

Ms. Brown is one of pioneering choreographers who helped defining the American postmodern dance in the 1960s. She officially stepped down from the position in her company in 2013, after being diagnosed with vascular dementia. At that time, two of her former dancers decided to move up as artistic directors. Jeanne Linnes, a new board president, took the job to activate a four-point plan, partially developed in collaboration with Ms. Brown. The aim is to sustain this choreographer’s work and influence.

The most important part of the plan is company’s shifting to tour with site-specific shows, called “Trisha Brown: In Pain Site,” explained Ms. Linnes, who’s the part of company’s board since 2001. Moving the dance performance to museum galleries, gardens and other locations will acquit some flexibility in repertory and venue selection, which would be a bit different compared to Ms. Brown’s large-scale style, made for traditional stages. These pieces are the focus of the recent period retrospective, “Proscenium Works 1979-2011.”

This 3-year tour, which lasted from 2013 to 2016, was bookended with shows at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Academy’s executive producer Joseph Melillo said that Brown had a long time performing history there, where her efforts to the dance status-quo created a loyal following: “This woman created a unique vocabulary that was not only respected by journalists and scholars but by New York audiences.” There are also some new plans to ensure that this single-choreographer company continues to live in times where many companies almost vanished after the death of their founders. For example, the Merce Cunningham Dance Company closed after similar event, and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre evolved into international success.

The campaign of $5 million fundraising is almost done, with the help of $600,000 by Dorothy Lichtenstein, the new board chair president of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. One part of that amount will go for the preparation of Trisha Brown’s archives, with extensive videotapes that may be put on sale eventually. “Putting these videos into better condition is a huge undertaking,” said Ms. Linnes. The plan contains two additional ways of sharing her legacy with new generation. The company will continue with the efforts on the educational level, at places like Duke University and Bard College, allowing more companies to experience Ms. Brown’s work.

Ms. Lichtenstein said: “Her dance had movement that followed the body’s missteps. A lot of her early work was without music—or with sounds that we weren’t used to calling music.” Her supporters claim that nothing about it is simple and that it needs careful preservation in intention to survive for a long time.

As the painters leave behind a visual legacy and the music of composers is played by many generations, the work of modern dance choreographers, who tend to create movements without names, often silence, can easily fade and be forgotten. If they don’t...