Tag - England

Health

“No thanks!” Mother Denies Accepting Her Son’s Award for Perfect Attendance

We get pretty worked up when our little munchkins achieve something great and get rewarded for it. Their excitement is really the cherry on top! However quite unlikely, this wasn’t the case for Rachel Wright, a UK mother, who challenged the obvious by rejecting her son’s 100% attendance award.

The Irony of Life

Imagine having a son being awarded for perfect health while another son suffers from extreme disabilities. Welcome to Rachel’s ironic life. Her perspective for treating an attendance award as an unethical approach stems from this exact conflicting situation.

Wright, a 40 year old blogger, author and a mother of three, is quite confident of her notion of denying an award that demonizes the weak. Rachel was greatly appalled when she was informed by the school that her 10 year old son has been awarded for turning up in class every day over the last academic year while her elder son is severely disabled since birth with multiple brain injuries. Rachel says that being sick or having an accident cannot be considered as lack of achievement. It is just a mix of genetics and luck which none of her children can control. According to Rachel, children do not fall sick out of choice and thus doling out prizes for perfect health is one of the most ridiculous concepts.

As a mother Rachel did not want to draw a line between the two siblings, making one more able than the other by accepting such a biased reward. She is glad that Jonah completely understands and accepts her viewpoint. Thus even though he will not be joining the celebrations in school, Rachel has planned an outing for him and his other friends (100% attendees or not) for giving in his best in the previous year.

The Facebook Post

In her post, Rachel outlines that the perfect attendance award contradicted their family values that seeks as many reasons as possible to praise and reward their children but being healthy is no tone of them. Furthermore, Wright states that her son went to school every day irrespective of his decision because she decided that he will not be kept away from school. So ideally, she should be rewarded (or not) for his attendance. To top her post off she states that she will be taking Jonah out for a holiday by taking out one week from school because she values rest just as much as school. However the only reason she made such an arrangement is because she can only leave when her elder son is in school due to him requiring a 24 hour care otherwise.

At the end of her Facebook post Rachel wrote that her son Jonah has been called for a celebratory evening at the soft play center to be awarded for perfect attendance. However, she says that as much as Jonah enjoys soft play and loves playing with his friends, he won’t be joining the celebrations.

Why go Public

Rachel says that she intended to make her decision go public only because she did not want other children who couldn’t win the attendance race to demean themselves or consider it as their failure.

Rachel’s post received over 2.5 million views and above a 20,000 likes along with mixed reactions to her views. But she completely respects the diverse comments and feedbacks on her post. Rachel only suggests that schools should seek other alternatives to help families and children who give non-genuine reasons to skip school. However she has left her post open for debate respecting everyone’s viewpoints.

We get pretty worked up when our little munchkins achieve something great and get rewarded for it. Their excitement is really the cherry on top! However quite unlikely, this wasn’t the case for Rachel Wright, a UK mother, who challenged the obvious by...

Vacation

An Iconic Stone Circle in the British Isles Unveils a Secret Thousands of Years old.

An array of stones arranged in a square was discovered under the Avebury world heritage site considered to be the largest stone circle in the world. The discovery includes a dozen large stones, each approximately 3 meters wide and weighing 40 tons each. According to researchers, the probably indicate the location of an important house dating back to 2000 B.C.

The researchers working at the site theorize that the original site included 100 huge stones arrayed in a circle with a 330 meter diameter. 24 miles from Avebury lays Stonehenge which in comparison is about quarter of the site’s size.

More Impressive than Stonehenge

Avebury is threatening to steal Stonehenge’s thunder by offering a richer, unique and more impressive subterranean attraction – a line of stones. Unlike other stone circles in the area, the stones in the Avebury array were arranged in a square – a parameter that researchers are paying a lot of attention to. According to The Telegraph, the oddest find was a wooden house that occupied the site at around 3500 BC.

Researchers theorize that the Neolithic hut was built by Avebury’s ancestors that as time passed it become an icon of birth of the community that after 1000 years descendents constructed the monumental square around its foundations, lining with massive stones enclosing an obelisk.

Oldest structure in a prehistoric site

Dr Mark Gillings from Leicester University School of Archaeology and Ancient History says that the square has the potential to be the one of the oldest structures in the prehistoric site. “We identified and mapped a line of prehistoric stones that were concealed and buried together with locations of other stones that were destroyed. Together we identified a unique square structure in the internal southern circle.”

According to common beliefs, stone circles were designed as an assembling area for pagan ceremonies, but many of them were destroyed, probably in the mid evil era when they were associated with paganism. Gillings says “There were probably many similar stones around this area at the time. It was quite and engineering feat for the time to arrange them in such a form. It was an endeavor that demanded a lot of hard work.”

In the centuries that followed, the square was dismantled and the stones were used to construct the three impressive stone circles which still stand today. The team also uncovered evidence that lines of stones once cut across the southern inner circle, like spokes on a wheel.

Almost 100 years of research

The new finds conclude Alexander Keiller ‘s research. Dr. Joshua Polard Secretary of the Prehistoric Society and the UK editor of the Journal of Social Archaeology and an archeology professor at Southampton University commented. Keiller, originally a marmalade magnate first discovered the a curious line of standing stones next to a fallen down obelisk in 1939 and started digging (despite thinking it was a middle ages structure). Oddly enough he found mainly domestic artifacts rather than ritual ones. When World War 2 broke out, the dig was abandoned and the site all but forgotten.

Pollard said to The Telegraph: “Our careful programme of geophysical survey has finally completed the work begun by Keiller. Megalithic circles are well known from the time when Avebury was built during the late Neolithic, but square megalithic settings of this scale and complexity are unheard of.”

Dr Nick Snashall, National Trust archaeologist at Avebury, added: “This discovery has been almost eighty years in the making but it’s been well worth waiting for. The completion of the work first started by Keiller in the 1930s has revealed an entirely new type of monument at the heart of the world’s largest prehistoric stone circle, using techniques he never dreamt of.”

An array of stones arranged in a square was discovered under the Avebury world heritage site considered to be the largest stone circle in the world. The discovery includes a dozen large stones, each approximately 3 meters wide and weighing 40 tons each...

Celebs

If She Were Alive Today. England Celebrates Lady D’s Birthday With Commemoration and Re-Dedication

Had it not been for that fatal night on the 31st of August 1997, Princess Diana may very have been with us today. The princess of the people, whom many people around the world, even today, 20 years after her death, remember more as a saint than a person. Her tragic death cut her life short at the age of 36.

A Day of Mourning

Today, people from all over England paid tribute to the late princess by covering Kensington Palace’s gates with flags, pictures of her life and memory cards. The princess’s sons, Prince William and Prince Harry and the Spencer family didn’t forget her either. The two, accompanied by Kate Middleton, Prince George and Princess Charlotte and Lady Diana’s brother, the Earl Spencer gathered in a private ceremony Althorp House, where Diana is buried to rededicate her grave. The Oval Lake at the estate was recently redesigned – the first redesign in the estate in over 350 years.

Prince Harry, now aged 32 was 12 when his mother passed. As he matured, his later teens and early twenties were riddled with scandals, whom many have blamed on his mother’s death. In an interview that he gave to Newsweek the prince stated that walking behind his mother’s coffin on live-TV, was an ordeal left a negative imprint on his personality and behavior for almost 2 decades. His brother Prince William said in a different interview that the funeral was the hardest things he had ever endured. Both princes agree that today children would not have been subjected to such an ordeal.

No More!

The two princes and the British royal family (together with the English public and media outlets) have shown their disgust to paparazzi practices that they feel brought about the death of the princess. Witnessing firsthand the toll these practices had on their mother and subsequently on them, Prince William has been very protective of Kate, and the media has respected his requests.

In 2012 a French paparazzi photographer caught a frame of Kate topless and the English public were outraged and demanded the photographer be extradited to the UK and stand trial. None of the English tabloids would publish them and photographers Cyril Moreau and Dominique Jacovides couldn’t sell them. Eventually Closer magazine and a small regional paper did publish them. The owner and executive editor of Closer were tried in France, along with the former publisher of the French regional newspaper that also ran the photos and the photographers who took them. The verdict is scheduled to be given on 04 July 2017.

Still Loved

Lady D’s presence in her son’s life and the English public hasn’t ended there. Prince William proposed to Kate Middleton with his mother’s engagement ring, and the radiant Duchess of Cambridge has been compared in fashion style, public appearance an charity work to the Late Princes. Additionally, William and Harry are much more popular than their father, Prince Charles, the first heir to the English Throne, and have taken much of their mother’s character and avid charity work. Persistent rumors continuously circle the queen that she plans on handing the throne over to Prince William rather than her son due to his conduct with Lady Diana those these have never been verified.

If the American public can still pinpoint where they were when JFK was murdered, the English public bear the death of Princes Diana as a national trauma.

Had it not been for that fatal night on the 31st of August 1997, Princess Diana may very have been with us today. The princess of the people, whom many people around the world, even today, 20 years after her death, remember more as a saint than a person. Her...

Entertainment Fashion

Is Fashion an Art?

Is fashion really an art? The topic everyone on the world wide web is talking about. Yes, it is! No, it isn’t?

Even in past, history has shown us that people dressed to express themselves. Everything started with ancient Egyptians. Their clothing was filled with a variation of colors, decorated with precious gems and jewels. And it was not only made for beauty, but also for comfort. Also, their clothes have been made to keep them cool while they are in the desert. Then ancient Greeks discovered some other materials and styles. Clothing in ancient Greek has been mainly made of chiton (costume), peplos (women clothes), himation (usually worn over a chiton) and chlamys (some type of short overcoat). And we are still talking about a period of time around fall of ancient Egyptian, Greek and the Roman empire. As humans evolved, and everything around them, so did fashion.

We can see in British culture from the 1830s to 1910s some really interesting changes in fashion, including changes in styles. Clothes were seen as an expression women’s place in society. Upper-class women usually tightly laced corset over a bodice or chemisette, paired with a skirt. The hat was standard formal wear for upper and middle-class men. Woman’s shoes in the early Victorian period (the 1830s) were narrow and heelless, black or white color. The heel on the shoes changed with time, like ethics and value.

Yes, we know, fashion is fashion and art is art. But we live in a modern world where everything is “growing” so fast, and we are humans and our basic need is to express ourselves. So, can fashion also be an art form? Museums are showing fashion just as much as paintings, or other art. Fashion can tell you about history, events, culture, etc. Many of the clothes seen going down the fashion runway don’t have any particular use, and many designers create impractical clothes just because they want to show their creativity, which is exactly what artist do in their craft. Designers are expressing themselves through clothes they made. I agree that there are many big brand names that make clothes that they think is going to be popular, just so they can sell and make money. But still, there are many true artists who express themselves in the way of creation. “A lot of designers collaborate with artists and incorporate features of art into their work such as Yves Saint Laurent and Piet Mondrian in 1965. Yves Saint Laurent’s dress was inspired by artist the Piet Mondrian. It was inspired by Piet Mondrian’s work which mainly consisted of thick black lines and primary colors. In this case, fashion was literally art.”

Fashion is not necessarily about labels, it’s not about brands. It’s something else that comes within the human being. What you wear is how you present yourself to the world, it’s your identity. Especially today, when human contacts are so quick, fashion is instant language. It’s a simple way of saying complicated things.

Is fashion really an art? The topic everyone on the world wide web is talking about. Yes, it is! No, it isn’t?
Even in past, history has shown us that people dressed to express themselves. Everything started with ancient Egyptians. Their clothing was filled...

Uncategorized

First artists union from England recognized in Landmark decision

De facto union was founded in 2014 by a group of artists that were exploited, after three years they are finally being recognized in a landmark decision, so they became England’s first official group for professional visual and applied artists.

In average, income for visual artists is around  £7.500 a year and yet employers are asking them to work for free, offering “exposure” in exchange for their artworks.

 

Artist’s Union England was founded to “redress the fact that all other cultural workers had independent representation from a Trade Union.”. They hope that they can fight the ramifications of austerity measurse and cuts to arts organisations, galleries, local authorities and publicly funded bodies.

The official “certificate of independence” is finally received after the group raised £ 4,500 for verification, which recognized the democratic functioning of the Union.

 

The majority of the charge was secured by gifts, including a few contributions from built up unions, for example, Scottish Artists Union, Musicians Union, and the General Federation of Trade Unions.

 

The Government site expresses that the Certification Office allows the accreditation in acknowledgment that the union is not under the mastery or control of bosses, and is not subject to impact emerging out of money related or material procurement.

“A new landscape for artists now exists,” the AUE said, “These core workers now have a trade union to represent them, which will work for better pay and conditions across England; where they can work together to challenge exploitative practice, be represented independently and democratically and raise the bar for artists.”

We found the explanation of their aims ”

Artists’ Union England was publicly launched in May 2014 by a cross section of artists from across the country, in response to an evident need for representation from a trade union. Unlike other cultural professionals, artists have had no collective voice in the form of a trade union, to represent them at work and to lobby and advocate on their behalf.

As a trade union, we aim to represent artists at strategic decision-making levels and positively influence the value and role artists play within society.

The Union is an opportunity to create a unique, sustainable and supportive infrastructure, which is built by its members for its members. We aim towards consensus decision-making and want to encourage an active grass roots membership and involvement with a wide geographical spread.

We want to challenge the economic inequalities in the art world by working together to negotiate fair pay and better working conditions for artists, as well as promote models for good practice.

We believe in fair remuneration for labour, which should translate to a wage comparable to other professionals. We are against unpaid labour. Fair and transparent payment for artists is not only ethically desirable, but vital for a sustainable and vibrant art world.

We seek to work with other unions, arts organisations, government bodies and cultural institutions whilst remaining both independent and transparent.

Artists’ Union England is funded solely by membership dues and donations, and we aim to be totally transparent in all our financial dealings. We are run by an executive committee and overseen by trustees, all of whom are artists and current members of the trade union.

The current executive committee and trustees first met together in September 2013, and are some of the founding members of Artists’ Union England. More information on the artists currently carrying out these roles can be found here. In forthcoming years all these positions will be elected at our Annual General Meeting.

We invite all artists to join and enter into dialogue with us to help shape the future of the union.”

 

image source: news.artnet.com

 

De facto union was founded in 2014 by a group of artists that were exploited, after three years they are finally being recognized in a landmark decision, so they became England’s first official group for professional visual and applied artists.
In...