Tag - environment

Earth Science

Watch: Animation Of What 80,000 Tons Of Garbage In The Ocean Looks Like

Each year, about 8 million tons of plastic waste ends up inside the sea. In the Great Pacific Garbage Patch alone, about 80,000 tons of debris find their way inside the ocean annually.

In recent years, plastic has continued to pose an increased level of threat to the ecosystem and human life in general. Most animals inside the sea ingest harmful chemicals such as microplastics which human consumption as well when they use these animals to prepare meals. It is estimated that about 8 million tons of plastic end up in the ocean annually.

The world generates a huge amount of plastic every year, large enough to build 50 pyramids of Giza. That automatically translates to over 350 million tons of candy wrappers, synthetic T-shirt and PVC pipes. 8 million tons end up in the sea while the rest end up in landfills each year. Most of them find their way into massive garbage patches in different parts of the world. A good example of such is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Each piece of plastic picked in this patch would result in 1.8 million individual parts. Such could weigh up to 80,000 tons which is equivalent to the weight of three statutes of liberty.

Half of the patch comprises of plastic fishing nets, ropes and lines as a result of the fishing activities performed in the area. The other half is made up of films and hard plastics such as plastic wraps and water bottles. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch does not refer to a mountain of debris as the name implies, rather it relates to waste that is scattered over an oceanic region that is twice the size of Texas alone.

It will take you 121 days to pick up every piece of plastic on the ocean at a walking pace of 5 km/hr. But the garbage patch has no end in reality because it is constantly flowing with the ocean currents. The size of the patch is getting bigger, and for 70 years, its size has been on the increase. The permanent nature of plastics causes this. For instance, a plastic fishing line will take at least 600 years to decompose.

Even after they break down, the resultant effect will still linger on the environment. Some of them decompose into microplastic and cannot be seen with the naked eye. But sea animals can ingest them, and when humans consume these animals, their health is automatically in danger. According to recent studies, every species of sea turtle has ingested these harmful microplastics including 60% of whales and seabirds.

Even at that, plastic is heaped unto the ocean on a daily basis. It has been estimated that by the year 2050, the number of plastics in the ocean will be more than the entire species of fishes in the oceans of the world.

When next you toss a water bottle inside the sea, have a deep thought on its recycling effect and how it is harmful to sea life and human life. You can contribute your quota to help make the environment safe for habitation.

We want to be better…So if you found a mistake in this article, please let us know

Each year, about 8 million tons of plastic waste ends up inside the sea. In the Great Pacific Garbage Patch alone, about 80,000 tons of debris find their way inside the ocean annually.
In recent years, plastic has continued to pose an increased level of...

Science

Beautiful NASA Map Shows What’s In The Air

The world has been, if you have not been paying much attention, a little hot recently, and no, this time we’re not talking politics. The climate is changing, and right now it doesn’t matter if it’s getting hotter or colder, what does matter is what’s in the air we breathe.

Getting people to care about this is tough, though, so some experts have made it a lot easier to show people the severity of the global situation. Simply link them to the image below, and they’ll see first-hand that stuff is going to get pretty severe if we don’t make an immediate move.

Above is a visualization created by NASA researchers of the particulates present in our atmosphere on a single day—August 23, 2018. It’s a visual representation of all the atmospheric particles floating around. These particles are caused both by nature and by human actions, and it’s going to help us see what kind of state the world is in. Spoiler: it’s not looking good.

The red, for example, showcases things like black carbon and combustion particles. From fuel being consumed to the numerous global wildfires, these are a perfect explanation of what is going wrong with the world. There’s a hell of a lot more red on that map than there should be, to be blunt.

The bright blue dots is where salt is being sprayed up into the atmosphere (be sea storms etc.). You can see the bright blue on the far left where Hurricane Lane got real close to the Hawaiian islands.

The purple/pink haze spreading across Western China, North Africa, and the Middle East is dust particles, carried from deserts by the winds. If you didn’t know, this dust, from China and North Africa, is providing the nutrients to sequoias in California while the Saharan dust fertilizing the Amazon.

This second photo shows wildfires around the globe a day earlier. In North America, these are wildfires, while in Africa it’s farmers burning fields in order to fertilize the ground.

With high concentrations of particles in the air almost certainly causing problems for human health, it’s safe to say that these problems are only going to get worst. With air pollution expected to kill as many as 3 million people per year globally, it’s time that we did something about this before it gets even worse.

We want to be better…So if you found a mistake in this article, please let us know

The world has been, if you have not been paying much attention, a little hot recently, and no, this time we’re not talking politics. The climate is changing, and right now it doesn’t matter if it’s getting hotter or colder, what does matter...

Animals Entertainment

Art for Awareness: How One Artist Used 10,000 Plastic Bottles And Mermaids to Bring Awareness to Pollution

Most of us barely know the facts about ocean pollution and the role that plastic bottle production plays in the situation. Part of that reason could possibly be because most people do not have the attention span to sit through an hour long informative film. However, LA based photographer Benjamin Von Wong decided to figure out how to combine both awareness and intriguing entertainment all together to bring out a powerful message. What was the core theme of his project? Mermaids. Yes, that’s right. Mermaids.

mermaid1

Von Wong has often described himself as “naive” when it would come to the subjects of his artwork, but this time around he found himself more passionate about this specific topic. After finding out that there will be more plastic bottles in the sea than fish by 2050, that was more than enough cause to bring Benjamin to begin his project.

“Alone I was just a photographer- but thanks to the help of amazing individuals we transformed a lifeless pile of used garbage into a message: #Mermaidshateplastic

Benjamin has been so enthusiastic about spreading his message, that he is even offering awards to those who take part in pledging to not use plastic again. The whole concept of the mermaids was to bring something more interesting to awareness than once again, informercials.

“In this case, all I knew was that plastic pollution was a boring topic and I had to find a way to make it more interesting.”

 

Watch the full process below and share this awesome project with your friends!

Most of us barely know the facts about ocean pollution and the role that plastic bottle production plays in the situation. Part of that reason could possibly be because most people do not have the attention span to sit through an hour long informative film...