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The African Hairstyle Exhibition That Will Blow You Away

There are many ways to utilize your natural hair when it comes to style and design; people have come up with the most intriguing looks that have set trends worldwide. One unnoticed trend and style is the hair of African women, and how they utilize their gorgeous curls. One weave and afro stylist, Lisa Farrall, decided to pay tribute to African culture and exceed beyond the percieved limits of how afros and weaves can be stylized. Her collection is called ‘Armor’, and it dedicates its image to cultural references with a mix of fabulous hair styles as well as a blend of warrior style clothing.

 

For a moment, let us admire the beauty of the woman in the picture. Her dark skin is pure and smooth, while her hair has a very intriguing weave blended into the warrior look. The painting along her body makes for more of an artistic feel, and overall she sits in a position of power and grace.

Now, this look is more of a powerful Goddess one, showing more of a stronger side on the warrior figure. The hair is everything in this picture, even more than the outfit itself. I admire the ringed necklace combined with the pure black dress. The hair looks one hundred percent natural, and the tint of white color makes it ten times more elaborate. For this look, I give it a ten out of ten!

Last but not least, we have the look of the mysterious warrior, hiding like a wolf in sheeps clothing. The silk hair matching the elaborately simple dress that leaves us wondering what this look represents in the aspect of African Culture. The white paint is subtle on the hair while the face is decorated with an intriguing pattern that makes you wonder about her story, and who she is.

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Overall, this collection truly leaves us in awe of the beauty of African women and African culture. It is truly amazing to see these different looks, and the models pulling it off at more than one hundred percent. The purpose behind this specific exhibit is to empower women of African descent to embrace who they are and feel the empowerment that comes along with being yourself. No matter what the color of your skin is, the ability to embrace every bit of your features can truly go a long way!

There are many ways to utilize your natural hair when it comes to style and design; people have come up with the most intriguing looks that have set trends worldwide. One unnoticed trend and style is the hair of African women, and how they utilize their...

editorial

Fall exhibitons – part 2

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Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium

This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after what the artist switched to the tropicalist spirit of the 1960s, presenting wearable capes, tents full of hay and agitrprop against Brazil’s ruling junta. Many figurines in Brazilian art have denounced the ejection of Dilma Rouseff, as an opponent of the military regime, as a modern time coup.

It is on view in Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 1 October – 2 January

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Monet: The Early Years

During 1920s this painter, who became a synonym for impressionism studied his two old friends and colleagues. It was his mentor Eugene Boudin, whose amazing seascapes passed really well within the new bourgeoisie, and his good friend Edouard Manet, whose flat nudes caused a scandal at the Salon at the time. This show is dedicated to the early work of Claude Monet, including his “Luncheon on the Grass” and his still unbelievable “Magpie”

It is on view in Kimbell Museum of Art, Fort Worth, 16 October – 29 January

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Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910 – 1950

After the Mexican revolution, a new painterly vocabulary appeared, thanks to country’s artists. It was a fusion of European modernism and local folklore traditions, which later became a global phenomenon. This huge show includes paintings by Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo alongside photography, books, and graphic design. There are also some the country’s most awesome murals, created by masters such as Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. It’s the most important 20th-century Mexican art exhibition in the U.S. since the second world war.

It is on view in Philadelphia Museum of Art, 25 October – 8 January

8

Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation

This a huge treasury of sculptures, textiles and gold, which travels from Germany to the U.S. for this historical exhibition, exactly 500 years after this religious reformer nailed his 95 theses to a church door in Wittenberg. Later, some iconoclastic Protestants made Luther endorsed painted images in a manner of encouraging piety, and some German painters, such as Lucas Cranach the Elder, who made magnificent narrative tableaux that jibed with Luther’s preaching. The show will also display bric-a-brac from the Luther family home, with jewelry and furniture.

It is on view in Minneapolis Institute of Art, 30 October – 15 January

Ugo Rondinone: Good Evening Beautiful Blue

This is the exhibition of Swiss master, known for glowing rainbows and stacks of fluorescent rocks in the Nevada desert. This is his first show in American museums, which coincides with Art Basel. Rondinone’s versatility, bordering on restlessness, sometimes come as a relief in an art world that privileges Identikit production. This exhibition promises not only video works and mirrored installations, but also a gallery of life-size clowns. The exhibition will be placed in the Bass’s renovated home, designed by the Japanese architect Arata Isozaki, which is located in South Beach.

It is on view in Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, 1 December – 27 March

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium
This is certainly the most long-awaited show this year. It’s a full retrospective of Brazil’s slipperiest postwar artist. Oiticica started the carrier with some vibrant and syncopated abstract paintings, after...

editorial

Fall exhibitions – part 1

Here’s the first part of the list of some very interesting exhibitions planned for this fall.

1

Doug Aitken: Electric Earth

It looks like a grove of trees, an undulating desert, with a horse in a field.  It’s a series of immersive and rhythmic video projections by Aitken, sending some intense and uncanny sensations to visitors. This first American retrospective of Californian artist will span 40,000 square feet. It includes seven of his hi-def video works, presenting one new work. Even if these installations can be seen as the biggest draw for Hollywood crowd, it also highlights some of his drawings and collages, which have the same subject, the displacement and urban life with more delicacy.

It is on view in Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 10 September – 15 January

2

Carmen Herrera: Lines of Sight

Some artists are lucky enough to get a major museum show right out of the school, while the others have to wait until they’re 100 years old. This one is an showcase for the Cuban-born painter, known for her exacting geometric compositions, made of contrasting blue and orange stripes, and sometimes of green triangles out in fields of white. The whole work has an emotional impact hidden behind those hard edges. Herrera was a student of the building arts at the University of Havana in 1938. Fidel Castro was still a child when she started.

It is on view in Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 16 September – 2 January

3

Inauguration of the National Museum of African American History and Culture

British architect David Adjaye has made an amazing home for the newest member museum of the Smithsonian. It is the African American museum whose designs fixtures are made by American slaves. It has 105,000 square feet of the exhibition space, dedicated to a new narrative of black history. This museum put together the entire collection in only 13 years. Now it has around 35,000 object, which is certainly the evidence of the goodwill and impatience that they had to cope with.

It will open in Washington DC, on 24 September

4

Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven

In the times when medieval mapmakers started to sketch the world, they put Levantine hub in the center of the map, referring to its importance in religion and trade. The Met’s show will take visitors to medieval Jerusalem, the main crossroad for Jews, Christians and Muslims, and also a host of visitors from faraway places like Scandinavia and India.

When medieval mapmakers sketched the known world, the city they put at the center was a Levantine hub as important for merchants as for believers. The Met’s fall blockbuster takes us to medieval Jerusalem, which was a crossroads not only for Jews, Christians and Muslims, but for a host of polytheistic visitors from as far as Scandinavia and India. According to this show’s manuscripts, prayer books and golden Torahs and Korans, this city will look like both a real city and an imaginary place.

It is on view in Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 26 September – 8 January

Los Angeles to New York: Dwan Gallery, 1959–1971

In late 50s, when Los Angeles still wasn’t the art world hub, the philanthropist and dealer Virginia Dwan opened doors of some important American galleries for avant garde painting. Later she became a champion of minimalism in New York. Now 84, Virginia gave her personal collection to the American people. There are also hundreds of odd works of art as a part of this show, made by artists such as Philip Guston, Agnes Martin, and Yves Klein.

It is on view in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2017.

 

image source: theguardian.com

Here’s the first part of the list of some very interesting exhibitions planned for this fall.

Doug Aitken: Electric Earth
It looks like a grove of trees, an undulating desert, with a horse in a field.  It’s a series of immersive and rhythmic...

City Life

Art Events to See in New York

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.

Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 

It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity and heartache. “A happy-go-lucky photojournalist” who subsequently “falls in love with a lawyer” who is having a little secret, not willing to share it. MoMA’s “Gaumont: Cinéma pour tout le monde” series will be on view till September 7.

Location: 11 West 53rd Street, New York
Price: adults $12, seniors $10, students $8.
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

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Outdoor Cinema: “Embrace of the Serpent” at Socrates Sculpture Park

This is the film by Colombian director Ciro Guerra which will be on view in this week’s edition of the Socrates Sculpture Park’s Outdoor Cinema program. It is also nominated for an Academy Award in Best Foreign Language Film. “Embrace of the Serpent” tells the great story of two scientists and the havoc they inadvertently wreak on a community in the Amazonian area.

Location: 32-01 Vernon Boulevard
Price: Free
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

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Launch of the Studio Museum in Harlem’s “in Harlem” 

This is about four artists and four uptown parks. The Studio Museum in Harlem will open a show of public works by Kevin Beasley in Morningside Park, Simone Leigh in Marcus Garvey Park, Kori Newkirk in St. Nicholas Park, and Rudy Shepherd in Jackie Robinson Park.

Visitors will be able to see some installations, including Beasley’s sculptures called “acoustic mirrors”. Leigh’s works is influenced by the architecture of the Shona-speaking people of Zimbabwe. Newkirk’s first appearance with public sculptures will show us some reflective fringe curtains. Shepherd’s “negative energy absorbers” are the sculptures that intend to “to dispel people’s feelings of racial prejudice, violence or ordinary disdain by opening them to more compassionate aspects of their personalities.”

Location: Four Harlem Parks
Price: Free
Time: 5:00–7:00 p.m. opening celebration at Marcus Garvey Park

 

 Cao Fei at Muesum of Modern Arts PS1: Exhibition Walkthrough with Xin Wang

Cao Fei’s first museum appearance in the United States will end on August 30. Before it happens, the art historian Xin Wang will lead a guided tour to explain some of the exhibition’s finer details. The work of Cao includes photography, video and installation. It engages with a dystopian modern condition. If we’re to borrow Kathleen Massara’s words, it is: “For the artist, there is always a way out, even if it is an imaginary one.”

 Location: 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City
Price: $10 adult
Time: 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

 

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Films To Come: Moholy-Nagy and the Moving Image at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 

During the last weekend of the summer movie program that focuses on Moholy-Nagy and the Bauhaus, visitors will see the magnificent screening of the 1936 sci-fi film called “Things To Come”. It is directed by William Cameron Menzies and it’s based on H.G. Wells’ novel which carries the same title. For this special occasion, Moholy-Nagy had to create some special effects.

Location: 1071 5th Avenue, New York (between 88th & 89th Street)
Price: adults $25, students and seniors $18
Time: 11:00 a.m.

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.
Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 
It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity...