Tag - New York

Humans Are Awesome

David Bowie’s Art Collection in Manhattan Sotheby’s

Months after the iconic rock star’s death, David Bowie’s life is still continuously unfolding itself to the world. He pioneered his own kind of music marked with reinvention and innovative stagecraft. He was one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time, and have amassed several platinum, gold and silver album certifications.

David Bowie died last January at the age of 69, and during his career, he was well known for his massive obsession with art. His collection will be on exhibit and auction at Sotheby’s Manhattan, and there will be over 350 items that’s up for sale. It includes his famous paintings, portraits and other modern, contemporary and post-modern Italian artworks. The auction will be held on November 10-11, 2016.

david-bowie-art

Sotheby’s previewed the famous rock star’s art collection last Monday in their gallery at New York, in preparation for the upcoming event. David Bowie’s collection extends to several artworks David Bomberg, Harold Gilman, Frank Auerbach, and Francis Picabia.

David Bowie’s Lifetime Love with Art and Everything Magnificent

In his lifetime, many have known him for his undying love with art. Even as a child, when he was in London, he studied art, design and music. The legendary musician once said that art was the seriously only thing that he wanted to own. To him, it can ‘change the way he feels in the morning’.

Apart from his music creations, he was also a painter and an art collector. The cover of his album Outside was painted by him. It was a self-portrait titled ‘The Dhead – Outside’ and was created as a signed lithograph.

Frank Auerbach’s “Head of Gerda Boehm” was said to have influenced Bowie in his work. The rock star had a profound connection to art and it seemed that art itself have connected to him deeply and in his creative process.

Among the most famous pieces he owned was Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Air Power”. It is said to be the most expensive  item in his collection and is estimated to go over $3 million in the auction.

His love for art wasn’t limited to music and paintings, but also in film. Bowie also starred as Andy Warhol in biopic Jean-Michel Basquiat’s biopic film in 1996, which was directed by Julian Schnabel.

He was also in the movies Everybody Loves Sunshine in 1999, Zoolander in 2001, and also made a cameo in TV episode of The Hunger. He played various roles behind the camera, and at one point, he was the scientist Nikola Tesla in Christopher Nolan’s The Prestige.

There was never a boring show when Bowie was on stage. He was always innovative and glamorous, and perhaps the most iconic artwork that stood as his persona was his makeup in Ziggy Stardust. His shaved eyebrows made an iconic statement, apart from his announcement in front of his fans that it’s was ‘the last show that we’ll ever do’.

For more information about David Bowie’s art collection and auction, please visit Sotheby’s website.

Months after the iconic rock star’s death, David Bowie’s life is still continuously unfolding itself to the world. He pioneered his own kind of music marked with reinvention and innovative stagecraft. He was one of the world’s best-selling artists...

Fashion

How Tech Transformed Designs in London and New York Fashion Week

London Fashion Week started this weekend and September is just ramping up for fall fashion. Aside from newf design trends, it seems that tech world have already infiltrated the fashion industry. New York Fashion Week got the first virtual catwalk and at the other side of the globe, London got its first Hololens fashion show. Here are some of the highlights on how tech have already transformed New York and London Fashion Week.

Hololens Fashion Show in London

VR headsets may be the next trend in gaming but we’re not talking about designer VR headsets.

Special guests of Martine Jarlgaard were in for the world’s first Hololens fashion show. They used Hololens headgear images of the entire 2017 collection. They walked into an empty showroom but were handed special gear to be able to see what isn’t visible to the naked eye.

Unlike virtual reality wherein you’re transported to another world inside the headset, Hololens works by superimposin holographic images to your natural environment. That way, you can still feel world around you, and you don’t have to worry about bumping into walls or other objects as you move around.

The whole collection was first scanned to create the holographic images. Although the designs are static images within models, viewers are able to go around the model and take a look at the outfit 360 degrees.

Burberry, Tommy Hilfiger and Chatbots

Chatbot games are gaining some interest from big fashion brands like Burberry. The strategy was also used by Tommy Hilfiger and they launched a chatbot via Facebook Messenger.

For those who have no idea what chatbots are, here’s a quick intro. Imagine a question and answer game where you have options to choose which way you want to move forward. Now picture that within your messenger and each answer you give determines how the chat will go as it moves further into the chatbot reply tree.

Example, you can answer yes or no on which collection you want to view. You can specify what color or item you want and it will describe the outfit as if you’re talking to a fashion advisor. So far, feedback on this tech have been positive and that some users find chatbots very engaging.

Meanwhile in New York Fashion Week which started earlier this September, it was high tech wearables that took the stage.

TOME and Intel Technology

Luxury designer TOME created a more fashionable accessories lineup with Intel Curie Technology. It helps women stay in track of their health while on the go.

FILA Connected Shoes

Keeping track of your fitness and health is all about gathering accurate and real time data. This is what FILA and Intel Curie Technology worked together in their newest shoe designs.

VOKE and Intel’s VR Livestream

Intel and Voke worked together to create a full 360 degrees virtual broadcast of Mischa’s newest collection. The fashion shows were livestreamed using VOKE’s GearVR app, Samsung VR headset and Intel’s tech . Although it was a completely virtual and new experience, it was a very convincing runway show.

London Fashion Week started this weekend and September is just ramping up for fall fashion. Aside from newf design trends, it seems that tech world have already infiltrated the fashion industry. New York Fashion Week got the first virtual catwalk and at the...

Celebs

Adele Bloch-Bauer Painting Reunited with Klimt’s Women of Vienna

Have you seen a gold, silver, and oil in canvas painting of a woman?

If you have watched the film Woman in Gold then you have a quick preview about the history of the famous Adele Bloch-Bauer portrait. It was based on a true story about Maria Altman, the niece of the Bloch-Bauer herself. Played by Oscar and Academy Award actress Helen Miren, the story evolved around Altman’s battle to recover the famous Klimt portrait of her aunt that was stolen by the Nazi’s during the war.

The Nazi during those dark times plundered homes and businesses. One of the houses that were raided belonged to Bloch-Bauer family. Jewelries, precious paintings and artworks were looted out by Nazi troop, and among those was the famous portrait of the woman in gold – Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I.

In about 60 years later, Altman continued to fight in order to have the portrait back to her family. Even though we can say that the painting is now worth several digits, it was a priceless portrait of her family. After years of tug of war, Altman won with the help of a family-friend lawyer.

Back to reality, the famous Klimt’s portraits are now reunited in a stunning exhibit in New York. Titled as, ‘Klimt and the Women of Vienna’s Golden Age’, it opens today at Neue Galerie New York and will be there up to January 16, 2017. It features Gustav Klimt’s painting of women in Vienna 1900–1918. It will mainly consist of 12 paintings, including the famous two portraits, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (1907), and Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II (1912).

Apart from the core paintings, the exhibit will also include 40 drawings and other 40 works of decorative art that are all centered in Klimt’s passion for women in ‘fin-de-siècle Vienna’.

Klimt captured her beauty and grandeur in a portrait with golden sky that blended beautifully with her gown and jewelry. It presented a character of sensuality and at the same time mystery over one of the wealthy families in Vienna.

Adele Bloch-Bauer was the wife of sugar mogul Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer. Their family were close to artists and Gustav Klimt was commissioned to create a portrait of her when she was around 25 years old. Adele was known to be a delicate woman, and was constantly going through illnesses and fatigue. Despite this, Klimt was able to create an immortal and powerful image of her.

In the second painting od Adele, she is seen in a more colorful and traditional style. The portrait showed her wearing a broad brimmed hat with people in the background. Flowers and green garden patch around her.

Among the other portraits included in the exhibit are:

  • Portrait of Szerena Lederer (1899),
  • Portrait of Gertha Loew (1902);
  • Portrait of Mäda Primavesi (1912);
  • Portrait of Elisabeth Lederer (1914-16),
  • and an unfinished Portrait of Ria Munk III (1917)

Gustav Klimt’s portraits of women showed the influence of fashion in Vienna. He has a unique ‘golden style’ that evolved around fauvism, and symbolism. For Klimt’s fans in the art world, the exhibit is truly a stunning reunion and a must-see.

Have you seen a gold, silver, and oil in canvas painting of a woman?
If you have watched the film Woman in Gold then you have a quick preview about the history of the famous Adele Bloch-Bauer portrait. It was based on a true story about Maria Altman, the...

City Life

Art Events to See in New York

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.

Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 

It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity and heartache. “A happy-go-lucky photojournalist” who subsequently “falls in love with a lawyer” who is having a little secret, not willing to share it. MoMA’s “Gaumont: Cinéma pour tout le monde” series will be on view till September 7.

Location: 11 West 53rd Street, New York
Price: adults $12, seniors $10, students $8.
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

musee gaumont

Outdoor Cinema: “Embrace of the Serpent” at Socrates Sculpture Park

This is the film by Colombian director Ciro Guerra which will be on view in this week’s edition of the Socrates Sculpture Park’s Outdoor Cinema program. It is also nominated for an Academy Award in Best Foreign Language Film. “Embrace of the Serpent” tells the great story of two scientists and the havoc they inadvertently wreak on a community in the Amazonian area.

Location: 32-01 Vernon Boulevard
Price: Free
Time: 7:00 p.m.

 

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Launch of the Studio Museum in Harlem’s “in Harlem” 

This is about four artists and four uptown parks. The Studio Museum in Harlem will open a show of public works by Kevin Beasley in Morningside Park, Simone Leigh in Marcus Garvey Park, Kori Newkirk in St. Nicholas Park, and Rudy Shepherd in Jackie Robinson Park.

Visitors will be able to see some installations, including Beasley’s sculptures called “acoustic mirrors”. Leigh’s works is influenced by the architecture of the Shona-speaking people of Zimbabwe. Newkirk’s first appearance with public sculptures will show us some reflective fringe curtains. Shepherd’s “negative energy absorbers” are the sculptures that intend to “to dispel people’s feelings of racial prejudice, violence or ordinary disdain by opening them to more compassionate aspects of their personalities.”

Location: Four Harlem Parks
Price: Free
Time: 5:00–7:00 p.m. opening celebration at Marcus Garvey Park

 

 Cao Fei at Muesum of Modern Arts PS1: Exhibition Walkthrough with Xin Wang

Cao Fei’s first museum appearance in the United States will end on August 30. Before it happens, the art historian Xin Wang will lead a guided tour to explain some of the exhibition’s finer details. The work of Cao includes photography, video and installation. It engages with a dystopian modern condition. If we’re to borrow Kathleen Massara’s words, it is: “For the artist, there is always a way out, even if it is an imaginary one.”

 Location: 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City
Price: $10 adult
Time: 4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

 

news

Films To Come: Moholy-Nagy and the Moving Image at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 

During the last weekend of the summer movie program that focuses on Moholy-Nagy and the Bauhaus, visitors will see the magnificent screening of the 1936 sci-fi film called “Things To Come”. It is directed by William Cameron Menzies and it’s based on H.G. Wells’ novel which carries the same title. For this special occasion, Moholy-Nagy had to create some special effects.

Location: 1071 5th Avenue, New York (between 88th & 89th Street)
Price: adults $25, students and seniors $18
Time: 11:00 a.m.

 Here’s the list of some shows around New York that you should visit.
Film on View: Pourquoi viens-tu si tard? (Too Late to Love) at Museum of Modern Arts 
It is a magnificent black-and-white movie by director Henri Decoin which confronts absurdity...

Celebs

Marie Lorenz on Hudson River

New York based artist Marie Lorenz showed up with two invited guests at the Village Community Boathouse, at Pier 40, on the Hudson River, couple of weeks ago. She finished her five-week journey in which she piloted a canoe from Buffalo, New York, to Manhattan, passing through the Erie Canal and the Hudson River. Her aim was to take her two landlubbing guests on the water in that same canoe that she had built by herself, whose sides had a print with design in marine grasses manner. She said: “I figured that today we would see if we can get across the river to New Jersey.”

GGG

For ten years this artist is offering transportation to people of New York who want a ride. They just have to name the desired destination, and then she checks out tide charts to see when the tide and current will be the safest to get the canoe there. She thinks that she’s made about 250 people rides by now. This project is the part of her journey-themed exhibition, called “Wanderlust”, which is on view on the High Line and it also includes artists such as Tony Matelli, Mike Nelson, Iman Issa and Rayyane Tabet. Those waterways around New York City have been the inspiration to many artists from various periods. One time Robert Smithson was sketching “Floating Island”, a barge covered with trees behind a tug boat on Hudson River.

BBB

Now in early 40s, Marie Lorenz started building boats at art school, while preparing a major in printmaking at the Rhode Island School of Design. At that time, the Providence River that runs through the city, was fully covered with roadways. She would sneak underneath them with boats she’d built, making a kind of performance art. She said: “When I moved to New York, the boat became more of a portal for others to see the city through me, and less of a spectacle.” She also wants us to look the wonders of nature with appreciation. She added: “You don’t necessarily think about the tide and the current in the grind of daily life, but there’s an immense force, moving all around the city, and it’s actually part of what made the city.”

HHH

On August 25 and September 15, Lorenz will give visitors a ride in canoe, as the part of the High Line show. They should just sing up until the list is fully subscribed. Those who miss it will be offered with free rowing sessions by the Village Community Boathouse. The part of its mission is “to restore safe, universal public access to our city’s largest public space—its waterways.”

The exhibition “Wanderlust” is on view on the High Line until March 2017. Marie Lorenz’s exhibition “Tide and Current Taxi” will be on view at the Everson Museum, Syracuse, New York, starting on September 23. Her other solo works such as “The Valley of Dry Bones”, “Archipelagio” and “Upriver” were on view in many states across the U.S. and Canada during last 8 years.

 

image source: news.artnet.com

New York based artist Marie Lorenz showed up with two invited guests at the Village Community Boathouse, at Pier 40, on the Hudson River, couple of weeks ago. She finished her five-week journey in which she piloted a canoe from Buffalo, New York, to...

Uncategorized

Ethnic diversity in museum staff

Two studies that are made not that long ago showed a lack of ethnic and racial diversity in museum staff in the US. People of color present 38% of USA’s population, they make only 16% in museum administration, conservators and educators, and 9% of museum boards. This shocking number tells a lot about offices and boardrooms of US cultural institutions. Those institutions have to decide what has to be done about this problem that occurred.

A year ago New York City Department of Cultural Affairs surveyed about 1000 local cultural organizations, they committed one million dollars to help to support diversity in city institutions. Institutions such as Metropolitan Museum of Art and Bronx Historical society were some of the institutions that were partaking in this program. Paid internships are being evaluated in order to help the removal of the barriers that are stopping people who can not afford to work for free.

After they surveyed 181 museums in partnership with the Mellon Foundation last year The Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) decided to acknowledge this problem and talk about it on their annual meeting in May. The survey results were eye opening, only 4% of curators, educators, conservators and top administrators are African American, 3%  are Hispanic, and %6 are Asian.

At the AAMD conference they were talking about how you build an institution that has cultures of inclusive excellence, rather than thinking of diversity as something that is a deficit that you need to fix in order that your program has a certain quality. In March the foundation launched a project with the help of Hunter College that will help students from under-represented and marginalized groups with their careers as New York City arts organization.

There was a striking change in the approach of this issue among directors. For example Rod Bigelow of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Arkansas, received a board endorsement to revise his title to executive director and chief diversity and inclusion officer, which means that these are the values he is responsible of. The museum hiring targets are based on the demographics of the early 2020s.

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, has announced a new initiative couple of weeks ago that they will hire diverse-owned investment first to take care of a portion of its 116 million dollars endowment.

The survey results are not a surprise for those who are working to change the sameness of the museum sphere; the statistics are going to help with the measuring of the improvement. „Information can be a powerful agent, those are the words from Holly Sidford of Helicon Collaborative, and she is working on promoting equity in cultural organizations. She knows that this topic is hard to talk about, but it’s the only way of solving the problem.

But some people have different ideas about the future changes. The New York- based development officer Nicole Reiner says that the funds should be given to struggling community organizations that are multicultural rather than trying to change the diversity of well funded more popular institutions.

Two studies that are made not that long ago showed a lack of ethnic and racial diversity in museum staff in the US. People of color present 38% of USA’s population, they make only 16% in museum administration, conservators and educators, and 9% of museum...

Humans Are Awesome

Unemployment by Josh Kline

Currently on view at 47 Canal, New York, Josh Kline’s show “Unemployment” is the situated in the year 2030, a story about people losing their jobs to software during the period approaching election. The whole look of the show is very pessimistic and bizarre, as the humans are presented as 3-D-printed sculptures, digital forms of their selves from the past. It has an atmosphere of apocalypse movies and the power of modern advertisement at its best, showing an image of economy that is very harmful and dangerous for people.

Josh Kline has already claimed an unique and recognizable style of his own. His work is characterized by the troubled dose of surrealism, including new technology and 3-D-printed format. Kline received grabbed attention last year at the New Museum Triennial with his “Occupy Wall Street” allegory, called Freedom”. It was a retrospective image of the social media’s devastating role during the huge recession in 2008.

Exhibition “Unemployment” contains of numerous different pieces put in particular order, so the people could see the whole story chronologically. At the beginning, there’s a vinyl chair and ottoman with shredded mail and various tax forms, from where the intensity of the situation rises significantly. In the main space of exhibition visitors can see granny carts with silicone bottles reminding us on those who collect them to recycle for very small amounts of money. But what is different with these bottles is that they all have the colors of skin.

There are also glass sculptures hanging from the ceiling packed with shoes, family photos and all the personal belongings that have no proper value and use in that modern time. 3-D-printed businesspeople in fetal position, packed in plastic bags, just like the bottles that wait to be recycled.

Josh Kline was born in 1979 in Philadelphia. Today he lives and works in New York, as a curator, collaborator and artist. Josh Kline places his artwork with the philosophy of post-humanism. Using a huge variety of media with the particular focus upon the technologically innovative, his works have an magnificent sensibility. It is concentrated mostly on the ability of humanity to function “normally” within its working environment, but being totally marginalized in favor of modern age digital expressions of selfhood.

The core of his work is found in the human obsession with an abstract future and that strange desire to project onto this imagined existence. It is a statement of art’s ability to exist even at the frontiers of scientific and technological advancement and also a warning against the potential to strip one’s humanity away to better function within a technocratic society of the  future.

The work of this young American artist is something definitely worth a look this year.

image source: moussemagazine.it

 

Currently on view at 47 Canal, New York, Josh Kline’s show “Unemployment” is the situated in the year 2030, a story about people losing their jobs to software during the period approaching election. The whole look of the show is very pessimistic and...