Tiny Soviet Moon Rocks Sell For Almost $1,000,000

When we hear that someone is selling ‘moon rocks’, we often imagine it’s the modern day snake oil. It’s just something that is hard to believe. If someone was the holder of some extraterrestrial rocks, then why would you ever choose to sell such an item?

It makes it easy to believe that they must be talking nonsense, then. However, with the help of an auction taking place at the moment, we might just get to see the real thing – actual moon rocks. This will go on sale at the Sotheby’s Auction House, and is expected to sell for as much as $1m when the auction takes place his week to come.

Indeed, according to Sotheby’s Auction House’ senior specialist for books and manuscripts, Cassandra Hatton, the product is legit. She said that: “You cannot buy or sell lunar material unless you have documentation proving that it can be owned by a private individual,

“As far as we know, this is the only lunar material that actually has that documentation, so it’s the only lunar sample that can be legally bought by a private individual.”

Where does it come from?

This particular lunar material is supposed to have been part of the 1970 lunar missions carried out by the Soviets. It was provided to the auction hose by Nina Ivanova Karoleva, the widow of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev. Korolev was the former director of the Soviet space program, and the rocks were then sold by Sotheby’s to an anonymous American for a fee of $442,500. These were sold in 1993, and now look to go for even more in 2018.

BBC

With a pre-sale estimate of $700,000-1m, they were auctioned on November 29th. In the end, the rocks eventually went for $855,000. This shows that the price and value of the rocks has almost doubled since they last went on sale in the 1990s.

This was not the first major sale this year either, in relation to the moon. A bag was sold by Sotheby’s last year which was supposed to have been laced with moon dust, and was used by US Astronaut Neil Armstrong during the first ever manned mission to the moon. It sold for around $1.8m.

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