New versions of “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Wonder Woman” are some of the potential blockbusters that are going to break records in theaters this year. But maybe the biggest news yet is that one TV show will be coming on big screens in the first week of September this year. The reason for this is that Marvel Television and ABC Television recently partnered with the giant movie screen company Imax Corp. The upcoming superhero series Inhumans will first be available in cinemas even a couple of weeks before it comes to homes and our little screens.

This could be the biggest and the boldest move yet because shows for the small screen and movies for the big screen already have some fuzzy lines between them. There is a pretty big wave of critical prestige that TV is enjoying. Movies used to have a cultural cachet that has now been taken over by the television screen. Featuring some of the biggest stars, Netflix’s “The Crown” and HBO’s “Westworld” look fairly expensive and seems to be a big budget movie. Ted Mundorff, chief executive of Landmark Theatres said: “Production values are fabulous on the small screen right now, so they translate to the large screen. If you want to see ‘Game of Thrones’ on the big screen, that’s pretty awesome.”

In the age where entertainment options at home are growing, both of these industries are having big challenges when it comes to the battle for audience’s attention. This comes at a time when TV is having a big push.

In the middle of a glut of original programs that have high quality, television companies are trying to find some ways to build hype around their new shows. Over 500 scripted shows are being prepared for this year for streaming services and TV. Cable network FX has estimated that it is about 200 less than in 2015.

Because the box office is becoming highly unpredictable, theater owners are hoping to diversify their businesses and are trying to fill their seats during the slow periods like the autumn months. In Imax, they really don’t like these gaps in the release schedule because they almost entirely rely on the major studios and their big spectacle movies. At the time when Inhumans will have its debut, the only potential blockbuster following it is the horror remake It by Warner Bros. Imax has around 1,200 theaters and they can’t say for sure how many of them will play Inhumans, but as it is expected, it will push for a worldwide release. Benjamin Mogil, an entertainment industry analyst with the financial services firm Stifel said: “The push Imax is making with Marvel for ‘Inhumans’ is indicative of a need to push out to content beyond movies.”

When auditoriums tend to go empty, theater owners played alternative programming like concerts, opera and sports such as professional basketball and football. This has been going on for several years now. But when that wasn’t enough, they expanded to include entertainment like major news events and competitive video gaming.

After the success of bringing popular small-screen shows to the multiplex, executives of big theater chains are looking forward to more TV shows that will come to their big screens. There are some shows that already appeared in cinemas like BBC’s Doctor Who and Sherlock andalso HBO’s Game of Thrones.

Get Your Popcorn Ready for these Hit Shows in the Big Screens

New versions of “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Wonder Woman” are some of the potential blockbusters that are going to break records in theaters this year. But maybe the biggest news yet is that one TV show will be coming on big screens in the first week of September this year. The reason for this is that Marvel Television and ABC Television recently partnered with the giant movie screen company Imax Corp. The upcoming superhero series Inhumans will first be available in cinemas even a couple of weeks before it comes to homes and our little screens.

This could be the biggest and the boldest move yet because shows for the small screen and movies for the big screen already have some fuzzy lines between them. There is a pretty big wave of critical prestige that TV is enjoying. Movies used to have a cultural cachet that has now been taken over by the television screen. Featuring some of the biggest stars, Netflix’s “The Crown” and HBO’s “Westworld” look fairly expensive and seems to be a big budget movie. Ted Mundorff, chief executive of Landmark Theatres said: “Production values are fabulous on the small screen right now, so they translate to the large screen. If you want to see ‘Game of Thrones’ on the big screen, that’s pretty awesome.”

In the age where entertainment options at home are growing, both of these industries are having big challenges when it comes to the battle for audience’s attention. This comes at a time when TV is having a big push.

In the middle of a glut of original programs that have high quality, television companies are trying to find some ways to build hype around their new shows. Over 500 scripted shows are being prepared for this year for streaming services and TV. Cable network FX has estimated that it is about 200 less than in 2015.

Because the box office is becoming highly unpredictable, theater owners are hoping to diversify their businesses and are trying to fill their seats during the slow periods like the autumn months. In Imax, they really don’t like these gaps in the release schedule because they almost entirely rely on the major studios and their big spectacle movies. At the time when Inhumans will have its debut, the only potential blockbuster following it is the horror remake It by Warner Bros. Imax has around 1,200 theaters and they can’t say for sure how many of them will play Inhumans, but as it is expected, it will push for a worldwide release. Benjamin Mogil, an entertainment industry analyst with the financial services firm Stifel said: “The push Imax is making with Marvel for ‘Inhumans’ is indicative of a need to push out to content beyond movies.”

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flickr.com
flickr.com

When auditoriums tend to go empty, theater owners played alternative programming like concerts, opera and sports such as professional basketball and football. This has been going on for several years now. But when that wasn’t enough, they expanded to include entertainment like major news events and competitive video gaming.

After the success of bringing popular small-screen shows to the multiplex, executives of big theater chains are looking forward to more TV shows that will come to their big screens. There are some shows that already appeared in cinemas like BBC’s Doctor Who and Sherlock andalso HBO’s Game of Thrones.

New versions of “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Wonder Woman” are some of the potential blockbusters that are going to break records in theaters this year. But maybe the biggest news yet is that one TV show will be coming on big screens in the first week of September this year. The reason for this is that Marvel Television and ABC Television recently partnered with the giant movie screen company Imax Corp. The upcoming superhero series Inhumans will first be available in cinemas even a couple of weeks before it comes to homes and our little screens.

This could be the biggest and the boldest move yet because shows for the small screen and movies for the big screen already have some fuzzy lines between them. There is a pretty big wave of critical prestige that TV is enjoying. Movies used to have a cultural cachet that has now been taken over by the television screen. Featuring some of the biggest stars, Netflix’s “The Crown” and HBO’s “Westworld” look fairly expensive and seems to be a big budget movie. Ted Mundorff, chief executive of Landmark Theatres said: “Production values are fabulous on the small screen right now, so they translate to the large screen. If you want to see ‘Game of Thrones’ on the big screen, that’s pretty awesome.”

In the age where entertainment options at home are growing, both of these industries are having big challenges when it comes to the battle for audience’s attention. This comes at a time when TV is having a big push.

In the middle of a glut of original programs that have high quality, television companies are trying to find some ways to build hype around their new shows. Over 500 scripted shows are being prepared for this year for streaming services and TV. Cable network FX has estimated that it is about 200 less than in 2015.

Because the box office is becoming highly unpredictable, theater owners are hoping to diversify their businesses and are trying to fill their seats during the slow periods like the autumn months. In Imax, they really don’t like these gaps in the release schedule because they almost entirely rely on the major studios and their big spectacle movies. At the time when Inhumans will have its debut, the only potential blockbuster following it is the horror remake It by Warner Bros. Imax has around 1,200 theaters and they can’t say for sure how many of them will play Inhumans, but as it is expected, it will push for a worldwide release. Benjamin Mogil, an entertainment industry analyst with the financial services firm Stifel said: “The push Imax is making with Marvel for ‘Inhumans’ is indicative of a need to push out to content beyond movies.”

flickr.com
flickr.com

When auditoriums tend to go empty, theater owners played alternative programming like concerts, opera and sports such as professional basketball and football. This has been going on for several years now. But when that wasn’t enough, they expanded to include entertainment like major news events and competitive video gaming.

After the success of bringing popular small-screen shows to the multiplex, executives of big theater chains are looking forward to more TV shows that will come to their big screens. There are some shows that already appeared in cinemas like BBC’s Doctor Who and Sherlock andalso HBO’s Game of Thrones.