For some time now, the world has been captured in ever-increasingly better detail. As we get access to sharper and more specific photography options, we can snapshots that previously would simply have not been possible.

The National Geographic Photo of the Year competition is one of the best ways to help you fully appreciate and understand this yourself.

From amazing shots of cities and skylines to underwater captures of amazing whales, you’ll find something for every kind of personal opportunity. In the end, the winner was to be Reiko Takahashi. Reiko managed to find some amazing shots, including a mesmeric tail-side shot of a humpback whale just off of Kumejima Island. She named it “Mermaid” and it managed to win the competition.

This gave Reiko both natural acclaim for her shot, and a nice $10,000 in the pocket for her troubles. Since she recently left her office job to get under the waves and capture amazing shots, that must feel pretty damn good!

Speaking about it, Reiko said: “It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,

“Most of the time, the calf stayed close to her mom. At one point, the calf began jumping and tapping its tail on the water near us—it was very friendly and curious. Finally, the mother, who was watching nearby, came to pick up the calf and swim away. I fell in love completely with the calf and it’s very energetic, large and beautiful tail.”

The Power of Imagery

You should definitely take a look at some of the other category winners, too. Top photos were chosen for each of the three categories, with Hiro Kurashina of Japan winning the “Cities” award ad Alessandra Meniconzi of Switzerland won the “People” award. They took $2,500 home each.

Some of the shots are truly special, with even some of the runners-up giving you a genuine appreciation of the beauty of the world that we live within. The Cities winner, “Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Kyushu” perfectly encapsulates the beautiful yet somewhat damp nature of life in Nagasaki.

Meanwhile, the Peoples winner, “Tea Culture” is the perfect capture of a truly special part of a culture. Be sure to take a look at the winners and runners-up on the official site: you will be able to get some truly special images to inspire yourself by.

Who knows, you might even take up photography and enter yourself next year!

We want to be better…So if you found a mistake in this article, please let us know

Wow: See The 2018 NG Photo of the Year Winner

For some time now, the world has been captured in ever-increasingly better detail. As we get access to sharper and more specific photography options, we can snapshots that previously would simply have not been possible.

The National Geographic Photo of the Year competition is one of the best ways to help you fully appreciate and understand this yourself.

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‘Mermaid’ by  Reiko Takahashi won the Grand Prize at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

From amazing shots of cities and skylines to underwater captures of amazing whales, you’ll find something for every kind of personal opportunity. In the end, the winner was to be Reiko Takahashi. Reiko managed to find some amazing shots, including a mesmeric tail-side shot of a humpback whale just off of Kumejima Island. She named it “Mermaid” and it managed to win the competition.

This gave Reiko both natural acclaim for her shot, and a nice $10,000 in the pocket for her troubles. Since she recently left her office job to get under the waves and capture amazing shots, that must feel pretty damn good!

Speaking about it, Reiko said: “It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,

“Most of the time, the calf stayed close to her mom. At one point, the calf began jumping and tapping its tail on the water near us—it was very friendly and curious. Finally, the mother, who was watching nearby, came to pick up the calf and swim away. I fell in love completely with the calf and it’s very energetic, large and beautiful tail.”

[remove_text_shortcode id="attachment_42499" align="aligncenter" width="750"]
‘Formation’ by Niklas Weber, Won the People’s Choice Award at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

The Power of Imagery

You should definitely take a look at some of the other category winners, too. Top photos were chosen for each of the three categories, with Hiro Kurashina of Japan winning the “Cities” award ad Alessandra Meniconzi of Switzerland won the “People” award. They took $2,500 home each.

[remove_text_shortcode id="attachment_42498" align="aligncenter" width="750"]
‘ANOTHER RAINY DAY IN NAGASAKI, JAPAN’ by Hiro Kurashina, Won the Cities category at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

Some of the shots are truly special, with even some of the runners-up giving you a genuine appreciation of the beauty of the world that we live within. The Cities winner, “Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Kyushu” perfectly encapsulates the beautiful yet somewhat damp nature of life in Nagasaki.

[remove_text_shortcode id="attachment_42497" align="aligncenter" width="750"]
‘Tea Party’ by Alessandra Meniconzi, Won the People category at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

Meanwhile, the Peoples winner, “Tea Culture” is the perfect capture of a truly special part of a culture. Be sure to take a look at the winners and runners-up on the official site: you will be able to get some truly special images to inspire yourself by.

Who knows, you might even take up photography and enter yourself next year!

We want to be better…So if you found a mistake in this article, please let us know

For some time now, the world has been captured in ever-increasingly better detail. As we get access to sharper and more specific photography options, we can snapshots that previously would simply have not been possible.

The National Geographic Photo of the Year competition is one of the best ways to help you fully appreciate and understand this yourself.

‘Mermaid’ by  Reiko Takahashi won the Grand Prize at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

From amazing shots of cities and skylines to underwater captures of amazing whales, you’ll find something for every kind of personal opportunity. In the end, the winner was to be Reiko Takahashi. Reiko managed to find some amazing shots, including a mesmeric tail-side shot of a humpback whale just off of Kumejima Island. She named it “Mermaid” and it managed to win the competition.

This gave Reiko both natural acclaim for her shot, and a nice $10,000 in the pocket for her troubles. Since she recently left her office job to get under the waves and capture amazing shots, that must feel pretty damn good!

Speaking about it, Reiko said: “It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,

“Most of the time, the calf stayed close to her mom. At one point, the calf began jumping and tapping its tail on the water near us—it was very friendly and curious. Finally, the mother, who was watching nearby, came to pick up the calf and swim away. I fell in love completely with the calf and it’s very energetic, large and beautiful tail.”

‘Formation’ by Niklas Weber, Won the People’s Choice Award at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

The Power of Imagery

You should definitely take a look at some of the other category winners, too. Top photos were chosen for each of the three categories, with Hiro Kurashina of Japan winning the “Cities” award ad Alessandra Meniconzi of Switzerland won the “People” award. They took $2,500 home each.

‘ANOTHER RAINY DAY IN NAGASAKI, JAPAN’ by Hiro Kurashina, Won the Cities category at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

Some of the shots are truly special, with even some of the runners-up giving you a genuine appreciation of the beauty of the world that we live within. The Cities winner, “Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Kyushu” perfectly encapsulates the beautiful yet somewhat damp nature of life in Nagasaki.

‘Tea Party’ by Alessandra Meniconzi, Won the People category at the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

Meanwhile, the Peoples winner, “Tea Culture” is the perfect capture of a truly special part of a culture. Be sure to take a look at the winners and runners-up on the official site: you will be able to get some truly special images to inspire yourself by.

Who knows, you might even take up photography and enter yourself next year!

We want to be better…So if you found a mistake in this article, please let us know